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Conference Paper: Associations of children’s mode of school commuting with health outcomes

TitleAssociations of children’s mode of school commuting with health outcomes
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherInternational Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA).
Citation
The 13th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA 2014), San Diego, California, USA, 21-24 May 2014. In the Abstract Book of the Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2014, p. 140-141, abstract no. O08.2 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: This study examined associations between school commuting mode and children’s cardiovascular and metabolic health. Methods: Participants were 226 children (48% boys), aged 8.1 (SD 0.4) years from Melbourne, Australia. Mothers reported their own highest level of education, and the frequency and duration of their child’s typical active (walking or cycling; 0 trips, 1-5 trips, >6 trips/week) and sedentary (travelling by car/bus; 0 trips, 1-60 mins, >60 mins/week) school commuting. Children’s waist circumference, blood pressure, height and weight were measured and BMI calculated. A fasted, morning blood sample determined total serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein (LDL-C) cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and insulin resistance. Moderate- to vigorousintensity physical activity (MVPA; ≥4METs) and sedentary time (≤100 counts/min) were objectively-measured using accelerometry. Associations were assessed by linear regression, adjusting for sex, maternal education, children’s MVPA or sedentary time (respectively) and clustering by school (unit of recruitment). Results: There was an inverse association between active commuting frequency (p=0.04) and duration (p=0.04) and LDLC scores. Increases in both frequency and duration of active commuting were associated with an approximately 0.12mmol/L decrease in LDL-C. A positive association was found between FPG and sedentary commuting duration (p=0.05), with increased duration associated with an approximately 0.09mmol/L increase in FPG. No other significant associations were observed. Conclusions: School commuting mode showed significant associations with two serum biomarkers. Interventions aiming to increase active commuting and decrease sedentary commuting are warranted as they may have an important positive effect on some aspects of children’s metabolic health.
DescriptionOral Session 08: Active Transport
The Abstract Book can be viewed at: http://isbnpa2014.org/2014%20ABSTRACTS.pdf
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206114

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHume, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorSalmon, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorHesketh, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorDunstan, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorDaly, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorTimperio, Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-20T12:29:03Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-20T12:29:03Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA 2014), San Diego, California, USA, 21-24 May 2014. In the Abstract Book of the Annual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 2014, p. 140-141, abstract no. O08.2en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206114-
dc.descriptionOral Session 08: Active Transport-
dc.descriptionThe Abstract Book can be viewed at: http://isbnpa2014.org/2014%20ABSTRACTS.pdf-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study examined associations between school commuting mode and children’s cardiovascular and metabolic health. Methods: Participants were 226 children (48% boys), aged 8.1 (SD 0.4) years from Melbourne, Australia. Mothers reported their own highest level of education, and the frequency and duration of their child’s typical active (walking or cycling; 0 trips, 1-5 trips, >6 trips/week) and sedentary (travelling by car/bus; 0 trips, 1-60 mins, >60 mins/week) school commuting. Children’s waist circumference, blood pressure, height and weight were measured and BMI calculated. A fasted, morning blood sample determined total serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein (LDL-C) cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and insulin resistance. Moderate- to vigorousintensity physical activity (MVPA; ≥4METs) and sedentary time (≤100 counts/min) were objectively-measured using accelerometry. Associations were assessed by linear regression, adjusting for sex, maternal education, children’s MVPA or sedentary time (respectively) and clustering by school (unit of recruitment). Results: There was an inverse association between active commuting frequency (p=0.04) and duration (p=0.04) and LDLC scores. Increases in both frequency and duration of active commuting were associated with an approximately 0.12mmol/L decrease in LDL-C. A positive association was found between FPG and sedentary commuting duration (p=0.05), with increased duration associated with an approximately 0.09mmol/L increase in FPG. No other significant associations were observed. Conclusions: School commuting mode showed significant associations with two serum biomarkers. Interventions aiming to increase active commuting and decrease sedentary commuting are warranted as they may have an important positive effect on some aspects of children’s metabolic health.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInternational Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA).-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA)en_US
dc.titleAssociations of children’s mode of school commuting with health outcomesen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros240747en_US
dc.identifier.spage140, abstract no. O08.2-
dc.identifier.epage141, abstract no. O08.2-

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