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postgraduate thesis: Molecular mechanism of disrupted capacitative calcium entry in familial Alzheimer's disease

TitleMolecular mechanism of disrupted capacitative calcium entry in familial Alzheimer's disease
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Tong, C. B. [唐俊傑]. (2013). Molecular mechanism of disrupted capacitative calcium entry in familial Alzheimer's disease. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5186500
AbstractPresenilin (PS) is the catalytic subunit of the gamma-secretase which is responsible for the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein to form beta amyloid (Aβ). Mutations in PS cause familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD) by increasing the Aβ plaques formation in the brain and thereby induce neurodegeneration. Apart from this, FAD-linked PS mutations have been demonstrated to disrupt cellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. Ca2+is a vital secondary messenger that involved in various neurophysiological functions, including memory, learning, and neuroplasticity and mounting evidence suggesting that Ca2+dysregulation associated with PS mutations may play a proximal role in the AD pathogenesis. Yet, the molecular mechanism for Ca2+dysregulation in AD remains debatable. It has been reported that cellular Ca2+homeostatsis can be disrupted in various ways. On the one hand, mutant PS has been demonstrated to exaggerate Ca2+release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through different pathways. On the other hand, attenuatedCa2+influx from the extracellular medium through the capacitative Ca2+entry (CCE) pathway has also been reported to bring about cellular Ca2+disruption. However, the molecular mechanism for the PS mutation-mediated CCE deficits is largely unknown. For this reason, the objective of the current study is to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism for attenuated CCE in AD. In this study, human neuronal cell line SH-SY5Y is employed as a cellular model to investigate the effect of wild-type or FAD-linked PS1 mutation on CCE pathway. Using single cell Ca2+imaging technique, significant CCE deficits was observed in SH-SY5Y stably expressing FAD-linked PS1mutation, PS1M146L. Interestingly, this CCE attenuation in PS1 mutant expressing cells was not mediated by the down-regulation of STIM1 and Orai1 expression, the known essential molecular players in the CCE pathway. Instead, co-immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assay have suggested a physical interaction between PS1 and STIM1 proteins. Moreover, a putative gamma-secretase mediated STIM1 cleavage was discovered by western blotting. In addition, confocal imaging showed that PS1M146L significantlyreduceSTIM1 puncta formation and ER translocation followed by the activation of CCE pathway by ER Ca2+store depletion with thapsigargin. This indicated that mutant PS1 attenuates CCE by affecting STIM1 oligomerization or its recruitment with Orai1. Taken together, our results suggested the negative regulatory role of PS on CCE pathway and hypothesized the molecular mechanism of CCE where FAD-linked PS mutation is perceived as a gain-of-function mutation and enhanced the negative impact on STIM1 to inhibit Ca2+entry.This hypothetic model provides new insights into the molecular regulation for CCE pathway and the identification of the interacting domains between PS1 and STIM1 may suggest novel targets for the development of therapeutic agents that help to treat the disease.
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
SubjectCellular signal transduction
Intracellular calcium
Alzheimer's disease - Molecular aspects
Dept/ProgramPhysiology
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205870

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTong, Chun-kit, Benjamin-
dc.contributor.author唐俊傑-
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-17T23:13:56Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-17T23:13:56Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationTong, C. B. [唐俊傑]. (2013). Molecular mechanism of disrupted capacitative calcium entry in familial Alzheimer's disease. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5186500-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205870-
dc.description.abstractPresenilin (PS) is the catalytic subunit of the gamma-secretase which is responsible for the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein to form beta amyloid (Aβ). Mutations in PS cause familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD) by increasing the Aβ plaques formation in the brain and thereby induce neurodegeneration. Apart from this, FAD-linked PS mutations have been demonstrated to disrupt cellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. Ca2+is a vital secondary messenger that involved in various neurophysiological functions, including memory, learning, and neuroplasticity and mounting evidence suggesting that Ca2+dysregulation associated with PS mutations may play a proximal role in the AD pathogenesis. Yet, the molecular mechanism for Ca2+dysregulation in AD remains debatable. It has been reported that cellular Ca2+homeostatsis can be disrupted in various ways. On the one hand, mutant PS has been demonstrated to exaggerate Ca2+release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through different pathways. On the other hand, attenuatedCa2+influx from the extracellular medium through the capacitative Ca2+entry (CCE) pathway has also been reported to bring about cellular Ca2+disruption. However, the molecular mechanism for the PS mutation-mediated CCE deficits is largely unknown. For this reason, the objective of the current study is to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism for attenuated CCE in AD. In this study, human neuronal cell line SH-SY5Y is employed as a cellular model to investigate the effect of wild-type or FAD-linked PS1 mutation on CCE pathway. Using single cell Ca2+imaging technique, significant CCE deficits was observed in SH-SY5Y stably expressing FAD-linked PS1mutation, PS1M146L. Interestingly, this CCE attenuation in PS1 mutant expressing cells was not mediated by the down-regulation of STIM1 and Orai1 expression, the known essential molecular players in the CCE pathway. Instead, co-immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assay have suggested a physical interaction between PS1 and STIM1 proteins. Moreover, a putative gamma-secretase mediated STIM1 cleavage was discovered by western blotting. In addition, confocal imaging showed that PS1M146L significantlyreduceSTIM1 puncta formation and ER translocation followed by the activation of CCE pathway by ER Ca2+store depletion with thapsigargin. This indicated that mutant PS1 attenuates CCE by affecting STIM1 oligomerization or its recruitment with Orai1. Taken together, our results suggested the negative regulatory role of PS on CCE pathway and hypothesized the molecular mechanism of CCE where FAD-linked PS mutation is perceived as a gain-of-function mutation and enhanced the negative impact on STIM1 to inhibit Ca2+entry.This hypothetic model provides new insights into the molecular regulation for CCE pathway and the identification of the interacting domains between PS1 and STIM1 may suggest novel targets for the development of therapeutic agents that help to treat the disease.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshCellular signal transduction-
dc.subject.lcshIntracellular calcium-
dc.subject.lcshAlzheimer's disease - Molecular aspects-
dc.titleMolecular mechanism of disrupted capacitative calcium entry in familial Alzheimer's disease-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5186500-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePhysiology-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5186500-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

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