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Article: Tracing the rise of ants - Out of the a ground

TitleTracing the rise of ants - Out of the a ground
Authors
Issue Date2013
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2013, v. 8, n. 12 How to Cite?
AbstractThe evolution of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) is increasingly well-understood due to recent phylogenetic analyses, along with estimates of divergence times and diversification rates. Yet, leading hypotheses regarding the ancestral habitat of ants conflict with new findings that early ant lineages are cryptic and subterranean. Where the ants evolved, in respect to habitat, and how habitat shifts took place over time have not been formally tested. Here, we reconstruct the habitat transitions of crown-group ants through time, focusing on where they nest and forage (in the canopy, litter, or soil). Based on ancestral character reconstructions, we show that in contrast to the current consensus based on verbal arguments that ants evolved in tropical leaf litter, the soil is supported as the ancestral stratum of all ants. We also find subsequent movements up into the litter and, in some cases, into the canopy. Given the global importance of ants, because of their diversity, ecological influence and status as the most successful eusocial lineage on Earth, understanding the early evolution of this lineage provides insight into the factors that made this group so successful today. Copyright: © 2013 Lucky et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205798
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLucky, Andrea W.-
dc.contributor.authorTrautwein, Michelle D.-
dc.contributor.authorGuénard, Benoît S.-
dc.contributor.authorWeiser, Michael D.-
dc.contributor.authorDunn, Robert R.-
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-06T08:02:22Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-06T08:02:22Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE, 2013, v. 8, n. 12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205798-
dc.description.abstractThe evolution of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) is increasingly well-understood due to recent phylogenetic analyses, along with estimates of divergence times and diversification rates. Yet, leading hypotheses regarding the ancestral habitat of ants conflict with new findings that early ant lineages are cryptic and subterranean. Where the ants evolved, in respect to habitat, and how habitat shifts took place over time have not been formally tested. Here, we reconstruct the habitat transitions of crown-group ants through time, focusing on where they nest and forage (in the canopy, litter, or soil). Based on ancestral character reconstructions, we show that in contrast to the current consensus based on verbal arguments that ants evolved in tropical leaf litter, the soil is supported as the ancestral stratum of all ants. We also find subsequent movements up into the litter and, in some cases, into the canopy. Given the global importance of ants, because of their diversity, ecological influence and status as the most successful eusocial lineage on Earth, understanding the early evolution of this lineage provides insight into the factors that made this group so successful today. Copyright: © 2013 Lucky et al.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONE-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleTracing the rise of ants - Out of the a ground-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0084012-
dc.identifier.pmid24386323-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84891337406-
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000329116700093-

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