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Article: Will the community nurse continue to function during H1N1 influenza pandemic: A cross-sectional study of Hong Kong community nurses?

TitleWill the community nurse continue to function during H1N1 influenza pandemic: A cross-sectional study of Hong Kong community nurses?
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
BMC Health Services Research, 2010, v. 10 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Healthcare workers have been identified as one of the high risk groups for being infected with influenza during influenza pandemic. Potential levels of absenteeism among healthcare workers in hospital settings are high. However, there was no study to explore the attitudes of healthcare workers in community setting towards the preparedness to the novel H1N1 influenza pandemic. The aim of this study was to explore the willingness of community nurses in Hong Kong to work during H1N1 influenza pandemic. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among all 401 community nurses employed by the Hospital Authority in Hong Kong when the WHO pandemic alert level was 6. Results. The response rate of this study was 66.6%. 76.9% participants reported being "not willing" (33.3%) or "not sure" (43.6%) to take care of patients during H1N1 influenza pandemic. The self-reported reasons for being unwilling to report to duty during H1N1 influenza pandemic were psychological stress (55.0%) and fear of being infected H1N1 influenza (29.2%). The reported unwillingness to report to duty was marginally significantly associated with the request for further training of using infection control clinical guideline (OR: 0.057; CI: 0.25-1.02). Those who reported unwillingness or not being sure about taking care of the patients during H1N1 influenza pandemic were more depressed (p < 0.001) and found work more emotionally stressful (p < 0.001). Conclusions. Interventions to provide infection control training and address community nurses' psychological needs might increase their willingness to provide care to patients in the community during H1N1 influenza pandemic. This would help to ensure an effective and appropriate health system response during the H1N1 influenza pandemic. © 2010 Wong et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205773
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Elizaly-
dc.contributor.authorKung, Kenny-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Anniewl-
dc.contributor.authorGao, Tiffany T.-
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Siân Meryl-
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-06T08:02:20Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-06T08:02:20Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Health Services Research, 2010, v. 10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205773-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Healthcare workers have been identified as one of the high risk groups for being infected with influenza during influenza pandemic. Potential levels of absenteeism among healthcare workers in hospital settings are high. However, there was no study to explore the attitudes of healthcare workers in community setting towards the preparedness to the novel H1N1 influenza pandemic. The aim of this study was to explore the willingness of community nurses in Hong Kong to work during H1N1 influenza pandemic. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among all 401 community nurses employed by the Hospital Authority in Hong Kong when the WHO pandemic alert level was 6. Results. The response rate of this study was 66.6%. 76.9% participants reported being "not willing" (33.3%) or "not sure" (43.6%) to take care of patients during H1N1 influenza pandemic. The self-reported reasons for being unwilling to report to duty during H1N1 influenza pandemic were psychological stress (55.0%) and fear of being infected H1N1 influenza (29.2%). The reported unwillingness to report to duty was marginally significantly associated with the request for further training of using infection control clinical guideline (OR: 0.057; CI: 0.25-1.02). Those who reported unwillingness or not being sure about taking care of the patients during H1N1 influenza pandemic were more depressed (p < 0.001) and found work more emotionally stressful (p < 0.001). Conclusions. Interventions to provide infection control training and address community nurses' psychological needs might increase their willingness to provide care to patients in the community during H1N1 influenza pandemic. This would help to ensure an effective and appropriate health system response during the H1N1 influenza pandemic. © 2010 Wong et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Health Services Research-
dc.titleWill the community nurse continue to function during H1N1 influenza pandemic: A cross-sectional study of Hong Kong community nurses?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6963-10-107-
dc.identifier.pmid20433691-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77951573816-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.eissn1472-6963-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000277997500001-

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