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Article: Disruption of ant-seed dispersal mutualisms by the invasive Asian needle ant (Pachycondyla chinensis)

TitleDisruption of ant-seed dispersal mutualisms by the invasive Asian needle ant (Pachycondyla chinensis)
Authors
KeywordsHexastylis arifolia
Exotic species
Aphaenogaster rudis
Seed-dispersal mutualisms
Myrmecochory
Issue Date2012
Citation
Biological Invasions, 2012, v. 14, n. 3, p. 557-565 How to Cite?
AbstractBy disrupting the structure of native ant assemblages, invasive ants can have effects across trophic levels. Most studies to date, however, have focused on the impacts just two species (Linepithema humile and Solenopsis invicta). The impacts of many other invasive ant species on ecological processes in their introduced range are unknown. In this study we tested the hypothesis that the invasive ant Pachycondyla chinensis disrupts ant-seed dispersal mutualisms by displacing native ant species, especially the keystone mutualist Aphaenogaster rudis, while failing to disperse seeds itself. In a paired design we measured the impact of P. chinensis on the native ant-plant seed dispersal mutualism. The number of A. rudis workers was 96% lower in invaded than in intact plots, and the number of seeds removed was 70% lower in these plots. Finally, in invaded plots the abundance of Hexastylis arifolia, a locally abundant myrmecochorous plant, was 50% lower than in plots where P. chinensis was absent. A parsimonious interpretation of our results is that P. chinensis causes precipitous declines in the abundance of A. rudis within invaded communities, thereby disrupting the ant-plant seed dispersal mutualisms and reducing abundances of ant-dispersed plants. In sum, the magnitude of the effects of P. chinensis on seed dispersal is quantitatively similar to that documented for the intensively studied invasive Argentine ant. We suggest that more studies on the impacts of less-studied invasive ant species on seed dispersal mutualisms may increase our knowledge of the effects of these invaders on ecosystem function. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205755
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.855
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.441
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez-Cabal, Mariano A.-
dc.contributor.authorStuble, Katharine L.-
dc.contributor.authorGuénard, Benoît S.-
dc.contributor.authorDunn, Robert R.-
dc.contributor.authorSanders, Nathan J.-
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-06T08:02:18Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-06T08:02:18Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationBiological Invasions, 2012, v. 14, n. 3, p. 557-565-
dc.identifier.issn1387-3547-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205755-
dc.description.abstractBy disrupting the structure of native ant assemblages, invasive ants can have effects across trophic levels. Most studies to date, however, have focused on the impacts just two species (Linepithema humile and Solenopsis invicta). The impacts of many other invasive ant species on ecological processes in their introduced range are unknown. In this study we tested the hypothesis that the invasive ant Pachycondyla chinensis disrupts ant-seed dispersal mutualisms by displacing native ant species, especially the keystone mutualist Aphaenogaster rudis, while failing to disperse seeds itself. In a paired design we measured the impact of P. chinensis on the native ant-plant seed dispersal mutualism. The number of A. rudis workers was 96% lower in invaded than in intact plots, and the number of seeds removed was 70% lower in these plots. Finally, in invaded plots the abundance of Hexastylis arifolia, a locally abundant myrmecochorous plant, was 50% lower than in plots where P. chinensis was absent. A parsimonious interpretation of our results is that P. chinensis causes precipitous declines in the abundance of A. rudis within invaded communities, thereby disrupting the ant-plant seed dispersal mutualisms and reducing abundances of ant-dispersed plants. In sum, the magnitude of the effects of P. chinensis on seed dispersal is quantitatively similar to that documented for the intensively studied invasive Argentine ant. We suggest that more studies on the impacts of less-studied invasive ant species on seed dispersal mutualisms may increase our knowledge of the effects of these invaders on ecosystem function. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBiological Invasions-
dc.subjectHexastylis arifolia-
dc.subjectExotic species-
dc.subjectAphaenogaster rudis-
dc.subjectSeed-dispersal mutualisms-
dc.subjectMyrmecochory-
dc.titleDisruption of ant-seed dispersal mutualisms by the invasive Asian needle ant (Pachycondyla chinensis)-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10530-011-0097-5-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84858002953-
dc.identifier.volume14-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage557-
dc.identifier.epage565-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000301445100007-

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