File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Climatic drivers of hemispheric asymmetry in global patterns of ant species richness

TitleClimatic drivers of hemispheric asymmetry in global patterns of ant species richness
Authors
KeywordsEocene
Latitudinal gradient
Formicidae
Climate change
Biodiversity
Issue Date2009
Citation
Ecology Letters, 2009, v. 12, n. 4, p. 324-333 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough many taxa show a latitudinal gradient in richness, the relationship between latitude and species richness is often asymmetrical between the northern and southern hemispheres. Here we examine the latitudinal pattern of species richness across 1003 local ant assemblages. We find latitudinal asymmetry, with southern hemisphere sites being more diverse than northern hemisphere sites. Most of this asymmetry could be explained statistically by differences in contemporary climate. Local ant species richness was positively associated with temperature, but negatively (although weakly) associated with temperature range and precipitation. After contemporary climate was accounted for, a modest difference in diversity between hemispheres persisted, suggesting that factors other than contemporary climate contributed to the hemispherical asymmetry. The most parsimonious explanation for this remaining asymmetry is that greater climate change since the Eocene in the northern than in the southern hemisphere has led to more extinctions in the northern hemisphere with consequent effects on local ant species richness. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205725
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 10.772
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 8.630
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDunn, Robert R.-
dc.contributor.authorAgosti, Donat-
dc.contributor.authorAndersen, Alan N.-
dc.contributor.authorArnan, Xavier-
dc.contributor.authorBrühl, Carsten Albrecht-
dc.contributor.authorCerdá, Xím-
dc.contributor.authorEllison, Aaron M.-
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Brian L.-
dc.contributor.authorFitzpatrick, Matthew C.-
dc.contributor.authorGibb, Heloise-
dc.contributor.authorGotelli, Nicholas J.-
dc.contributor.authorGove, Aaron D.-
dc.contributor.authorGuénard, Benoît S.-
dc.contributor.authorJanda, Milan-
dc.contributor.authorKaspari, Michael E.-
dc.contributor.authorLaurent, Edward J.-
dc.contributor.authorLessard, Jean Philippe-
dc.contributor.authorLongino, John T.-
dc.contributor.authorMajer, Jonathan D.-
dc.contributor.authorMenke, Sean B.-
dc.contributor.authorMcGlynn, Terrence P.-
dc.contributor.authorParr, Catherine L.-
dc.contributor.authorPhilpott, Stacy M.-
dc.contributor.authorPfeiffer, Martin-
dc.contributor.authorRetana, Javier Retana-
dc.contributor.authorSuarez, Andrew V.-
dc.contributor.authorVasconcelos, Heraldo Heraldo-
dc.contributor.authorWeiser, Michael D.-
dc.contributor.authorSanders, Nathan J.-
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-06T08:02:16Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-06T08:02:16Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationEcology Letters, 2009, v. 12, n. 4, p. 324-333-
dc.identifier.issn1461-023X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205725-
dc.description.abstractAlthough many taxa show a latitudinal gradient in richness, the relationship between latitude and species richness is often asymmetrical between the northern and southern hemispheres. Here we examine the latitudinal pattern of species richness across 1003 local ant assemblages. We find latitudinal asymmetry, with southern hemisphere sites being more diverse than northern hemisphere sites. Most of this asymmetry could be explained statistically by differences in contemporary climate. Local ant species richness was positively associated with temperature, but negatively (although weakly) associated with temperature range and precipitation. After contemporary climate was accounted for, a modest difference in diversity between hemispheres persisted, suggesting that factors other than contemporary climate contributed to the hemispherical asymmetry. The most parsimonious explanation for this remaining asymmetry is that greater climate change since the Eocene in the northern than in the southern hemisphere has led to more extinctions in the northern hemisphere with consequent effects on local ant species richness. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEcology Letters-
dc.subjectEocene-
dc.subjectLatitudinal gradient-
dc.subjectFormicidae-
dc.subjectClimate change-
dc.subjectBiodiversity-
dc.titleClimatic drivers of hemispheric asymmetry in global patterns of ant species richness-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1461-0248.2009.01291.x-
dc.identifier.pmid19292793-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-62249209482-
dc.identifier.volume12-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage324-
dc.identifier.epage333-
dc.identifier.eissn1461-0248-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000264067600006-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats