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Conference Paper: Crowdsourcing in medical education: a visual example using anatomical henna

TitleCrowdsourcing in medical education: a visual example using anatomical henna
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherFederation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.fasebj.org/
Citation
The Annual Meeting of the American Association of Anatomists (AAA), San Diego, USA, 26-29 April 2014. In The FASEB Journal, 2014, v. 28 n. Suppl.1, p. abstract no. 721.23 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction Crowdsourcing can be defined as; “the practice of obtaining needed ideas or content by soliciting contributions from a large group of people, particularly using online methods”. It has become prevalent in many modern arenas such as filmmaking and software design. However, when applied to a ‘crowd’ of medical students, it can become a rich source of ideas for pedagogical innovation. This qualitative study demonstrates the unexpected and innovative manner in which a student body generates its own learning methods through crowdsourcing. Methods Using crowdsourcing techniques, medical students discussed gross anatomy learning objectives and submitted their own designs of learning methods through both online and small-group offline collaborations over several months. These were incorporated onto the bodies of volunteer models in traditional Indian henna, Maori and African Tribal patterns by a henna artist. Results 4 novel student-derived learning methodologies were elicited; phonetic devices, visuo-spacial devices, alpha-numeric conversions and supra-structure. Discussion Using crowdsourcing to further medical education follows the paradigm of student-centred learning by generating engagement and a sense of ownership in the student body. This study demonstrates its utility as a technique for qualitative exploration of current student learning methods.
DescriptionPoster Presentation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205540
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.299
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.775

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSee, CYHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T03:34:49Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T03:34:49Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Annual Meeting of the American Association of Anatomists (AAA), San Diego, USA, 26-29 April 2014. In The FASEB Journal, 2014, v. 28 n. Suppl.1, p. abstract no. 721.23en_US
dc.identifier.issn0892-6638-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205540-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Crowdsourcing can be defined as; “the practice of obtaining needed ideas or content by soliciting contributions from a large group of people, particularly using online methods”. It has become prevalent in many modern arenas such as filmmaking and software design. However, when applied to a ‘crowd’ of medical students, it can become a rich source of ideas for pedagogical innovation. This qualitative study demonstrates the unexpected and innovative manner in which a student body generates its own learning methods through crowdsourcing. Methods Using crowdsourcing techniques, medical students discussed gross anatomy learning objectives and submitted their own designs of learning methods through both online and small-group offline collaborations over several months. These were incorporated onto the bodies of volunteer models in traditional Indian henna, Maori and African Tribal patterns by a henna artist. Results 4 novel student-derived learning methodologies were elicited; phonetic devices, visuo-spacial devices, alpha-numeric conversions and supra-structure. Discussion Using crowdsourcing to further medical education follows the paradigm of student-centred learning by generating engagement and a sense of ownership in the student body. This study demonstrates its utility as a technique for qualitative exploration of current student learning methods.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherFederation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.fasebj.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofThe FASEB Journalen_US
dc.titleCrowdsourcing in medical education: a visual example using anatomical hennaen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.hkuros240577en_US
dc.identifier.volume28-
dc.identifier.issueSuppl.1-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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