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Article: Emergent writing of Chinese Characters by Pre-schoolers in Hong Kong

TitleEmergent writing of Chinese Characters by Pre-schoolers in Hong Kong
香港幼兒書寫漢字的“過渡字”研究
Authors
KeywordsEmergent writing
Chinese Characters
Preschoolers
Kindergarten
Handwriting
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe Korea Association for Han-Character and Classical Written Language Education (韓國漢字漢文教育學會). The Journal's web site is located at http://studyhanja.net/
Citation
漢字漢文教育, 2014, v. 34, p. 213-238 How to Cite?
Han-Character and Classical Writing Language Education, 2014, v. 34, p. 213-238 How to Cite?
AbstractShould pre-schoolers start learning how to write Chinese characters? This has been a controversial topic among the public and education circle in mainland China and Hong Kong. In the 60’s and 70’s, as writing was part of the requirement for Primary One admission tests, kindergartens had to start preparing children by drilling them into practicing writing. This was a painful experience for many pre-schoolers as their cognitive development at that age were not ready to differentiate and identify character structure and character stroke sequence. Many of them lost interest in learning Chinese characters, although some of them did pick up this required skill from mere drilling. This practice has been discouraged by the Education Bureau of Hong Kong Government. However, some kindergarten teachers and parents still keep this practice. This study will focus on free writing and drawing for preschoolers, and attempts to investigate if children are able to write characters during free writing and drawing sessions, through participant observation and case studies. The study will also make comparisons between what preschoolers write during free writing and drawing when there is no pressure and the conventional characters they would write during normal lessons. At the tender age of 3 to 4, children are not able to follow through the conventional learning process of characters writing. Hence if they can also practice emergent writing where they are allowed to form emergent characters or even drawings during free writing, this can help them to recognize the characters though the stroke sequence or even the characters written may not be precise by conventional standards. This interim stage of learning has found to be important for reading and beneficial for preschoolers to write conventional characters better at a later stage.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205492
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, SKen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, MYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, TNen_US
dc.contributor.authorTo-Chan, SPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T02:57:30Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T02:57:30Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citation漢字漢文教育, 2014, v. 34, p. 213-238en_US
dc.identifier.citationHan-Character and Classical Writing Language Education, 2014, v. 34, p. 213-238en_US
dc.identifier.issn1598-1363-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205492-
dc.description.abstractShould pre-schoolers start learning how to write Chinese characters? This has been a controversial topic among the public and education circle in mainland China and Hong Kong. In the 60’s and 70’s, as writing was part of the requirement for Primary One admission tests, kindergartens had to start preparing children by drilling them into practicing writing. This was a painful experience for many pre-schoolers as their cognitive development at that age were not ready to differentiate and identify character structure and character stroke sequence. Many of them lost interest in learning Chinese characters, although some of them did pick up this required skill from mere drilling. This practice has been discouraged by the Education Bureau of Hong Kong Government. However, some kindergarten teachers and parents still keep this practice. This study will focus on free writing and drawing for preschoolers, and attempts to investigate if children are able to write characters during free writing and drawing sessions, through participant observation and case studies. The study will also make comparisons between what preschoolers write during free writing and drawing when there is no pressure and the conventional characters they would write during normal lessons. At the tender age of 3 to 4, children are not able to follow through the conventional learning process of characters writing. Hence if they can also practice emergent writing where they are allowed to form emergent characters or even drawings during free writing, this can help them to recognize the characters though the stroke sequence or even the characters written may not be precise by conventional standards. This interim stage of learning has found to be important for reading and beneficial for preschoolers to write conventional characters better at a later stage.en_US
dc.languagechien_US
dc.publisherThe Korea Association for Han-Character and Classical Written Language Education (韓國漢字漢文教育學會). The Journal's web site is located at http://studyhanja.net/en_US
dc.relation.ispartof漢字漢文教育en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHan-Character and Classical Writing Language Educationen_US
dc.subjectEmergent writing-
dc.subjectChinese Characters-
dc.subjectPreschoolers-
dc.subjectKindergarten-
dc.subjectHandwriting-
dc.titleEmergent writing of Chinese Characters by Pre-schoolers in Hong Kongen_US
dc.title香港幼兒書寫漢字的“過渡字”研究-
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, SK: sktse@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, MY: yingwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTse, SK=rp00964en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.15670/HACE.2014.34.1.213-
dc.identifier.hkuros235301en_US
dc.identifier.volume34en_US
dc.identifier.spage213en_US
dc.identifier.epage238en_US
dc.publisher.placeSouth Koreaen_US

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