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Article: Secondhand smoke exposure and maternal action to protect children from secondhand smoke: Pre- and post-smokefree legislation in Hong Kong

TitleSecondhand smoke exposure and maternal action to protect children from secondhand smoke: Pre- and post-smokefree legislation in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
PLoS One, 2014, v. 9 n. 8, p. e105781 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Smokefree legislation may protect children from secondhand smoke (SHS) in the home from smoking parent(s). We examined the effect of the 2007 smokefree legislation on children's exposure to SHS in the home and maternal action to protect children from SHS exposure in Hong Kong. Methods: Families with a smoking father and a non-smoking mother were recruited from public clinics before (2005-2006, n = 333) and after the legislation (2007-2008, n = 742) which led to a major extension of smokefree places in Hong Kong. Main outcomes included children's SHS exposure in the home, nicotine level in mothers' and children's hair and home environment, mothers' action to protect children from SHS, and their support to the fathers to quit. Results: Fewer mothers post-legislation reported children's SHS exposure in the home (87.2% versus 29.3%, p<0.01), which was consistent with their hair nicotine levels (0.36ng/mg versus 0.04ng/mg, p<0.01). More mothers post-legislation in the last month took their children away from cigarette smoke (6.3% versus 92.2%; p<0.01) and advised fathers to quit over 3 times (8.3% versus 33.8%; p<0.01). No significant change was found in the content of smoking cessation advice and the proportion of mothers who took specific action to support the fathers to quit. Conclusions: SHS exposure in the home decreased and maternal action to protect children from SHS increased after the 2007 smokefree legislation. Maternal support to fathers to quit showed moderate improvement. Cessation services for smokers and specific interventions for smoking families should be expanded together with smokefree legislation. © 2014 Chan et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205471
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, SSCen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, YTDen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, YPen_US
dc.contributor.authorMak, YWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T02:36:19Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T02:36:19Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One, 2014, v. 9 n. 8, p. e105781en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205471-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Smokefree legislation may protect children from secondhand smoke (SHS) in the home from smoking parent(s). We examined the effect of the 2007 smokefree legislation on children's exposure to SHS in the home and maternal action to protect children from SHS exposure in Hong Kong. Methods: Families with a smoking father and a non-smoking mother were recruited from public clinics before (2005-2006, n = 333) and after the legislation (2007-2008, n = 742) which led to a major extension of smokefree places in Hong Kong. Main outcomes included children's SHS exposure in the home, nicotine level in mothers' and children's hair and home environment, mothers' action to protect children from SHS, and their support to the fathers to quit. Results: Fewer mothers post-legislation reported children's SHS exposure in the home (87.2% versus 29.3%, p<0.01), which was consistent with their hair nicotine levels (0.36ng/mg versus 0.04ng/mg, p<0.01). More mothers post-legislation in the last month took their children away from cigarette smoke (6.3% versus 92.2%; p<0.01) and advised fathers to quit over 3 times (8.3% versus 33.8%; p<0.01). No significant change was found in the content of smoking cessation advice and the proportion of mothers who took specific action to support the fathers to quit. Conclusions: SHS exposure in the home decreased and maternal action to protect children from SHS increased after the 2007 smokefree legislation. Maternal support to fathers to quit showed moderate improvement. Cessation services for smokers and specific interventions for smoking families should be expanded together with smokefree legislation. © 2014 Chan et al.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Oneen_US
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleSecondhand smoke exposure and maternal action to protect children from secondhand smoke: Pre- and post-smokefree legislation in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, SSC: nssophia@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, YTD: takderek@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, YP: dorisl@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMak, YW: makyw@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SSC=rp00423en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, YP=rp00465en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMak, YW=rp00525en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0105781en_US
dc.identifier.pmid25166507-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84940323774-
dc.identifier.hkuros238449en_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spagee105781en_US
dc.identifier.epagee105781en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000341303700043-

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