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Book Chapter: Helping Children with Reading Disability in Chinese: The Response to Intervention Approach with Effective Evidence-Based Curriculum

TitleHelping Children with Reading Disability in Chinese: The Response to Intervention Approach with Effective Evidence-Based Curriculum
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Helping Children with Reading Disability in Chinese: The Response to Intervention Approach with Effective Evidence-Based Curriculum. In Chen, X., Qang, Q & Luo, YC (Eds.), Reading Development and Difficulties in Monolingual and Bilingual Chinese Children, p. 103-124. Dordrecht: Springer, 2014 How to Cite?
AbstractTo accomplish effective evidence-based intervention for children with reading disability (RD), it is important to integrate basic and applied research findings and take into consideration some language-specific learning demands. In this chapter, research findings regarding the cognitive profile of Chinese RD are reported and the relevance of the profile for teaching Chinese children with RD is discussed. In particular, a Chinese tiered intervention model with core reading instruction curriculum, which we have developed and implemented in 37 primary schools in Hong Kong, is introduced. This Chinese model has successfully improved the various cognitive skills, literacy skills, and learning motivation of the children in the Program Schools. In particular, 18–58 % of poor readers in Tier 2 and 7 % dyslexic readers in Tier 3 remedial groups, who originally fell below the benchmark, reaching the benchmark of Chinese literacy after receiving the intervention for 1–2 years. Comparing the core reading components in Chinese and the Big Five in English suggests that different cognitive demands are needed for reading diverse orthographies—phonological training is essential for learning to read English, whereas orthographic and morphological training is significant for reading success in Chinese.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205300
ISBN
Series/Report no.Literacy studies; v. 8

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, CSHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, YKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, DWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, KKHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, SCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T02:19:01Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T02:19:01Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationHelping Children with Reading Disability in Chinese: The Response to Intervention Approach with Effective Evidence-Based Curriculum. In Chen, X., Qang, Q & Luo, YC (Eds.), Reading Development and Difficulties in Monolingual and Bilingual Chinese Children, p. 103-124. Dordrecht: Springer, 2014en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9789400773790-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205300-
dc.description.abstractTo accomplish effective evidence-based intervention for children with reading disability (RD), it is important to integrate basic and applied research findings and take into consideration some language-specific learning demands. In this chapter, research findings regarding the cognitive profile of Chinese RD are reported and the relevance of the profile for teaching Chinese children with RD is discussed. In particular, a Chinese tiered intervention model with core reading instruction curriculum, which we have developed and implemented in 37 primary schools in Hong Kong, is introduced. This Chinese model has successfully improved the various cognitive skills, literacy skills, and learning motivation of the children in the Program Schools. In particular, 18–58 % of poor readers in Tier 2 and 7 % dyslexic readers in Tier 3 remedial groups, who originally fell below the benchmark, reaching the benchmark of Chinese literacy after receiving the intervention for 1–2 years. Comparing the core reading components in Chinese and the Big Five in English suggests that different cognitive demands are needed for reading diverse orthographies—phonological training is essential for learning to read English, whereas orthographic and morphological training is significant for reading success in Chinese.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofReading Development and Difficulties in Monolingual and Bilingual Chinese Childrenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLiteracy studies; v. 8-
dc.titleHelping Children with Reading Disability in Chinese: The Response to Intervention Approach with Effective Evidence-Based Curriculumen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, CSH: shhoc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, CSH=rp00631en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-94-007-7380-6_6-
dc.identifier.hkuros237146en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros248595-
dc.identifier.spage103-
dc.identifier.epage124-
dc.publisher.placeDordrecht-

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