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Book Chapter: Regulatory B Cells - Implications in Autoimmune and Allergic Disorders

TitleRegulatory B Cells - Implications in Autoimmune and Allergic Disorders
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherInTech
Citation
Regulatory B Cells - Implications in Autoimmune and Allergic Disorders. In Kanwar, JR (Ed.), Recent Advances in Immunology to Target Cancer, Inflammation and Infections, p. 177-200. Rijeka, Croatia: InTech, 2012 How to Cite?
AbstractB lymphocytes are a major player in the immune system and their best understood effector functions are antibody production, presentation of antigens to T cells and modulation of immune responses via cytokine production. Most B cell functions are considered to amplify immune responses, but it has also been demonstrated that due to production of immunosuppressive cytokines or antibodies, B cells can down-regulate immune responses and have the ability to induce tolerance. These B cells with regulatory capacity (Breg cells) have been shown to suppress effector functions of various target cells including T cells, dendritic cells and macrophages, and can even convert effector T cells into regulatory T cells. The most prominent mechanism of Breg mediated suppression is the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-β. Additional suppression mechanisms via cell-cell contact, involving surface molecules such as program death-1 (PD-1), CD80/CD86 and FasL mediating target cell apoptosis, have been described as well. Most importantly, Breg cells have been implicated in various inflammatory conditions, such as allergic and autoimmune diseases. There is evidence for Breg deficiencies in human SLE patients and various adoptive transfer experiments in mouse models of autoimmune and allergic diseases indicate that Breg cells are capable of suppressing disease development. In this review we endeavour to give an overview of the current knowledge about regulatory B cell immunobiology and their implications in allergic and autoimmune conditions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205288
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSattler, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorder Vlugt, LVen_US
dc.contributor.authorHussaarts, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorSmits, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T02:17:12Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T02:17:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationRegulatory B Cells - Implications in Autoimmune and Allergic Disorders. In Kanwar, JR (Ed.), Recent Advances in Immunology to Target Cancer, Inflammation and Infections, p. 177-200. Rijeka, Croatia: InTech, 2012en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9789535105923-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205288-
dc.description.abstractB lymphocytes are a major player in the immune system and their best understood effector functions are antibody production, presentation of antigens to T cells and modulation of immune responses via cytokine production. Most B cell functions are considered to amplify immune responses, but it has also been demonstrated that due to production of immunosuppressive cytokines or antibodies, B cells can down-regulate immune responses and have the ability to induce tolerance. These B cells with regulatory capacity (Breg cells) have been shown to suppress effector functions of various target cells including T cells, dendritic cells and macrophages, and can even convert effector T cells into regulatory T cells. The most prominent mechanism of Breg mediated suppression is the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-β. Additional suppression mechanisms via cell-cell contact, involving surface molecules such as program death-1 (PD-1), CD80/CD86 and FasL mediating target cell apoptosis, have been described as well. Most importantly, Breg cells have been implicated in various inflammatory conditions, such as allergic and autoimmune diseases. There is evidence for Breg deficiencies in human SLE patients and various adoptive transfer experiments in mouse models of autoimmune and allergic diseases indicate that Breg cells are capable of suppressing disease development. In this review we endeavour to give an overview of the current knowledge about regulatory B cell immunobiology and their implications in allergic and autoimmune conditions.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInTechen_US
dc.relation.ispartofRecent Advances in Immunology to Target Cancer, Inflammation and Infections-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleRegulatory B Cells - Implications in Autoimmune and Allergic Disordersen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailHuang, F: fphuang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHuang, F=rp01922en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5772/38319en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros240062en_US
dc.identifier.spage177en_US
dc.identifier.epage200en_US
dc.publisher.placeRijeka, Croatia-

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