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Book Chapter: Regulatory T Cell Deficiency in Systemic Autoimmune Disorders – Causal Relationship and Underlying Immunological Mechanisms

TitleRegulatory T Cell Deficiency in Systemic Autoimmune Disorders – Causal Relationship and Underlying Immunological Mechanisms
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherInTech
Citation
Regulatory T Cell Deficiency in Systemic Autoimmune Disorders – Causal Relationship and Underlying Immunological Mechanisms. In Mavragani, CP (Ed.), Autoimmune Disorders - Pathogenetic Aspects, p. 111-126. Rijeka, Croatia: InTech, 2011 How to Cite?
AbstractLupus disease is intriguing clinically and immunologically for its systemic nature and complexity in pathogenesis. Presence of autoantibodies to a diverse array of self antigens is a key feature of the disease. The broad B cell auto-reactivity is known to be predominately T cell-dependent, but the mechanism underlying such a systemic loss of self tolerance has yet to be fully understood. Regulatory T cells (Treg) play important roles in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. These cells may exert their immunosuppressive effects on T effector cells (Teff) in an antigen-nonspecific way, possibly via their actions on the so-called antigen presenting cells (APC), dendritic cells (DC) in particular. Aberrant Treg frequencies and functions have recently been demonstrated both in lupus patients and in the animal models which develop spontaneously a lupus-like disease. These findings provided potentially therefore a plausible explanation for the systemic nature of the disease. However, there have been differences in the conclusions drawn from these various studies as to whether the lack of Treg-mediated control of auto-aggression is due to abnormal Treg frequency or functions. In this chapter, I’ll compare findings from these different studies and discuss their relevance in the context of systemic autoimmune disorders. The important issues here are about the causal relationship and underlying immunological mechanisms leading to the Treg abnormalities, as well as potential clinical implications in systemic autoimmunity
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205286
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorSattler, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T02:17:11Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T02:17:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationRegulatory T Cell Deficiency in Systemic Autoimmune Disorders – Causal Relationship and Underlying Immunological Mechanisms. In Mavragani, CP (Ed.), Autoimmune Disorders - Pathogenetic Aspects, p. 111-126. Rijeka, Croatia: InTech, 2011en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9789533076430-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205286-
dc.description.abstractLupus disease is intriguing clinically and immunologically for its systemic nature and complexity in pathogenesis. Presence of autoantibodies to a diverse array of self antigens is a key feature of the disease. The broad B cell auto-reactivity is known to be predominately T cell-dependent, but the mechanism underlying such a systemic loss of self tolerance has yet to be fully understood. Regulatory T cells (Treg) play important roles in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. These cells may exert their immunosuppressive effects on T effector cells (Teff) in an antigen-nonspecific way, possibly via their actions on the so-called antigen presenting cells (APC), dendritic cells (DC) in particular. Aberrant Treg frequencies and functions have recently been demonstrated both in lupus patients and in the animal models which develop spontaneously a lupus-like disease. These findings provided potentially therefore a plausible explanation for the systemic nature of the disease. However, there have been differences in the conclusions drawn from these various studies as to whether the lack of Treg-mediated control of auto-aggression is due to abnormal Treg frequency or functions. In this chapter, I’ll compare findings from these different studies and discuss their relevance in the context of systemic autoimmune disorders. The important issues here are about the causal relationship and underlying immunological mechanisms leading to the Treg abnormalities, as well as potential clinical implications in systemic autoimmunityen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInTechen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAutoimmune Disorders - Pathogenetic Aspects-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleRegulatory T Cell Deficiency in Systemic Autoimmune Disorders – Causal Relationship and Underlying Immunological Mechanismsen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailHuang, F: fphuang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHuang, F=rp01922en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5772/21297en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros240059en_US
dc.identifier.spage111en_US
dc.identifier.epage126en_US
dc.publisher.placeRijeka, Croatia-

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