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Book Chapter: Quantitative Analysis of Climate Change and Human Crises in History

TitleQuantitative Analysis of Climate Change and Human Crises in History
Authors
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Quantitative Analysis of Climate Change and Human Crises in History. In Kwan, MP ... (et al) (Eds.), Space-Time Integration in Geography and GIScience: Research Frontiers in the US and China, p. 235-267. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer How to Cite?
AbstractThe association between climate change and human crises in history was conceived a century ago. Yet, it remained controversial and even questioned in academia for some time because it was usually substantiated with selective historical cases and verified by qualitative methods. The causal mechanism of the climate-crisis connection was rarely explored. Breakthrough did not occur until high resolution paleo-climate reconstructions become available in recent years. Based on high resolution paleo-climate reconstructions and fine-grained historical socio-economic datasets, we adopted a pioneering approach to examining quantitatively the climate-crisis relationship in pre-industrial societies. Our research findings demonstrated scientifically the association between climate change and various human crises (i.e., population checks, population collapses, and socio-political chaos) in China, Europe, and other countries/regions in the Northern Hemisphere in the pre-industrial era. Furthermore, we worked out a set of causal linkages showing how climate change is eventually translated into human crises. Those linkages were validated by statistical methods. Our results concluded that deteriorating climate, which led to reduced land carrying capacity, was the ultimate cause of human crises in pre-industrial societies. This challenges the Malthusian explanation for human misery. Our studies start a new page in climate change research. With the increasing availability and precision of paleo-climate reconstructions, the application of more sophisticated methods in the climate-crisis research is going to be facilitated. Hopefully, the role played by climate change in human history can be fully unveiled in the near future.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205241
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T02:05:59Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T02:05:59Z-
dc.identifier.citationQuantitative Analysis of Climate Change and Human Crises in History. In Kwan, MP ... (et al) (Eds.), Space-Time Integration in Geography and GIScience: Research Frontiers in the US and China, p. 235-267. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springeren_US
dc.identifier.isbn9789401792042-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205241-
dc.description.abstractThe association between climate change and human crises in history was conceived a century ago. Yet, it remained controversial and even questioned in academia for some time because it was usually substantiated with selective historical cases and verified by qualitative methods. The causal mechanism of the climate-crisis connection was rarely explored. Breakthrough did not occur until high resolution paleo-climate reconstructions become available in recent years. Based on high resolution paleo-climate reconstructions and fine-grained historical socio-economic datasets, we adopted a pioneering approach to examining quantitatively the climate-crisis relationship in pre-industrial societies. Our research findings demonstrated scientifically the association between climate change and various human crises (i.e., population checks, population collapses, and socio-political chaos) in China, Europe, and other countries/regions in the Northern Hemisphere in the pre-industrial era. Furthermore, we worked out a set of causal linkages showing how climate change is eventually translated into human crises. Those linkages were validated by statistical methods. Our results concluded that deteriorating climate, which led to reduced land carrying capacity, was the ultimate cause of human crises in pre-industrial societies. This challenges the Malthusian explanation for human misery. Our studies start a new page in climate change research. With the increasing availability and precision of paleo-climate reconstructions, the application of more sophisticated methods in the climate-crisis research is going to be facilitated. Hopefully, the role played by climate change in human history can be fully unveiled in the near future.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofSpace-Time Integration in Geography and GIScience: Research Frontiers in the US and Chinaen_US
dc.titleQuantitative Analysis of Climate Change and Human Crises in Historyen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, F: harry.lee@graduate.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, D: zhangd@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, F=rp00646en_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, D=rp00649en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-94-017-9205-9_14-
dc.identifier.hkuros239532en_US
dc.identifier.spage235-
dc.identifier.epage267-
dc.publisher.placeDordrecht, Netherlandsen_US

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