File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Book Chapter: Implementing the Innovative 2003 English Curriculum for Senior Secondary Schools in China: Teachers’ Beliefs and Practices

TitleImplementing the Innovative 2003 English Curriculum for Senior Secondary Schools in China: Teachers’ Beliefs and Practices
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Implementing the Innovative 2003 English Curriculum for Senior Secondary Schools in China: Teachers’ Beliefs and Practices. In Coniam, D (Ed.), English Language Education and Assessment: Recent Developments in Hong Kong and the Chinese Mainland, p. 35-50. Singapore: Springer, 2014 How to Cite?
AbstractThis chapter describes a study of teachers’ beliefs and practices in the process of implementing the innovative 2003 English curriculum for senior secondary schools in China. Data were collected with 4 h of in-depth interviews and 16 h of classroom observation from four teachers in two schools of different standing in the city of Guangzhou, China. The study found that these teachers’ beliefs about the English language and about teaching and learning the language are largely, albeit with individual variations, in line with the curriculum and that they are teaching according to the curriculum to different degrees, regarding teaching content, types of teaching and learning activities, and the roles that they play in these activities. This study argues that teachers are able to articulate their views about the subject that they are teaching and about how they should teach it; and they make decisions in the classroom drawing on these views in response to school and social contexts. Teachers’ beliefs, their practices, and their context of work are interactive, dynamic, and mutually constitutive. This interplay becomes more crucial in the implementation of large-scale curriculum innovations, where teacher change in both beliefs and practices is essential. Such interplay does not apply only to China; it applies in many situations where new curriculums are being implemented around the world.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205185
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Wen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T01:54:28Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T01:54:28Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationImplementing the Innovative 2003 English Curriculum for Senior Secondary Schools in China: Teachers’ Beliefs and Practices. In Coniam, D (Ed.), English Language Education and Assessment: Recent Developments in Hong Kong and the Chinese Mainland, p. 35-50. Singapore: Springer, 2014en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9789812870704en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205185-
dc.description.abstractThis chapter describes a study of teachers’ beliefs and practices in the process of implementing the innovative 2003 English curriculum for senior secondary schools in China. Data were collected with 4 h of in-depth interviews and 16 h of classroom observation from four teachers in two schools of different standing in the city of Guangzhou, China. The study found that these teachers’ beliefs about the English language and about teaching and learning the language are largely, albeit with individual variations, in line with the curriculum and that they are teaching according to the curriculum to different degrees, regarding teaching content, types of teaching and learning activities, and the roles that they play in these activities. This study argues that teachers are able to articulate their views about the subject that they are teaching and about how they should teach it; and they make decisions in the classroom drawing on these views in response to school and social contexts. Teachers’ beliefs, their practices, and their context of work are interactive, dynamic, and mutually constitutive. This interplay becomes more crucial in the implementation of large-scale curriculum innovations, where teacher change in both beliefs and practices is essential. Such interplay does not apply only to China; it applies in many situations where new curriculums are being implemented around the world.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnglish Language Education and Assessment: Recent Developments in Hong Kong and the Chinese Mainlanden_US
dc.titleImplementing the Innovative 2003 English Curriculum for Senior Secondary Schools in China: Teachers’ Beliefs and Practicesen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailWang, W: wwfeng@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-981-287-071-1_3en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros235453en_US
dc.identifier.spage35en_US
dc.identifier.epage50en_US
dc.publisher.placeSingaporeen_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats