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Conference Paper: Dance Movement Therapy for Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy: A Qualitative Investigation of Motivation, Needs and Benefits

TitleDance Movement Therapy for Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy: A Qualitative Investigation of Motivation, Needs and Benefits
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
The 15th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology and Psychosocial Academy, Rotterdam, Netherlands, 4–8 November 2013. In Psycho-Oncology, 2013, v. 22 suppl. 3, p. 212, abstract no. P2-12 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Radiotherapy often leads to a multitude of physical side effects leading to psychological distress and impaired qualities of life. Focusing on mind-body connection, dance-movement therapy (DMT) can potentially bring upon both physical and psychological healing through its creative movement processes. This presentation will comprehensively explore patient needs during radiotherapy, motivation to participate in bodymind interventions, changes as a result of DMT, and attitudes after radiotherapy, which is little known for Chinese breast cancer survivors. METHOD: 105 Chinese breast cancer patients who were undergoing or just completing radiotherapy were recruited from hospitals in Hong Kong. The qualitative study design complements a larger randomized-controlled trial to provide in-depth understanding on the needs and experience of patients. Upon completing the 6-session DMT (9 contact hours), participants commented (in writing) on how the intervention benefited them (or not), what helped them get through the 5 week radiotherapy and what was now most important to them. Comments were coded using content analyses. Resultant themes were verified and detailed via focus groups with 8 participants conducted once before and once after DMT. RESULTS: Participants agree that radiotherapy is time to resume participation in groups so as to resume normality. DMT was attractive compared with other psychosocial groups for its physical benefits. Patients were motivated to resume exercise appropriate for them and overcoming the side-effects of preceding chemotherapy; despite painful arms and fear of sweat affecting radiotherapy sites. Patients appreciated both physical and psychosocial benefits of DMT. Physical improvements counteracted side effects of treatments, leading to better sleep and increased wiliness to exercise at home. Psychosocial benefits included released emotions through movement, enhanced cancer coping particularly through radiotherapy, changed attitudes, feeling less alone, etc. CONCLUSIONS: For breast cancer patients, radiotherapy is typically a period when they battle with residual side-effects from chemotherapy or surgery compounded by fears of other side-effects arising from radiotherapy. Yet, seeing an impending end to frequent hospital visits, their budding desire to resume exercise renders body-mind interventions particularly appealing to patients at this stage. Understanding their needs and motivations at unique treatment periods enable the design of appropriate interventions. Nonetheless, patients’ motivation is dampened by not knowing the intensity and type of exercise deemed appropriate. DMT is recommended for patients undergoing radiotherapy for its extensive mental, physical and social therapeutic elements. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF FUNDING: This study is part of a randomized controlled trial funded by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council’s General Research Fund (HKU745110H). We would also like to thank the Hong Kong Cancer Fund, Queen Mary Hospital and Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital, but most of all, participating survivors in this study.
DescriptionPoster Presentation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205124
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, HYPen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTHen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KPCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_US
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSFen_US
dc.contributor.authorLuk, MYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T01:27:35Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T01:27:35Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 15th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology and Psychosocial Academy, Rotterdam, Netherlands, 4–8 November 2013. In Psycho-Oncology, 2013, v. 22 suppl. 3, p. 212, abstract no. P2-12en_US
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205124-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Radiotherapy often leads to a multitude of physical side effects leading to psychological distress and impaired qualities of life. Focusing on mind-body connection, dance-movement therapy (DMT) can potentially bring upon both physical and psychological healing through its creative movement processes. This presentation will comprehensively explore patient needs during radiotherapy, motivation to participate in bodymind interventions, changes as a result of DMT, and attitudes after radiotherapy, which is little known for Chinese breast cancer survivors. METHOD: 105 Chinese breast cancer patients who were undergoing or just completing radiotherapy were recruited from hospitals in Hong Kong. The qualitative study design complements a larger randomized-controlled trial to provide in-depth understanding on the needs and experience of patients. Upon completing the 6-session DMT (9 contact hours), participants commented (in writing) on how the intervention benefited them (or not), what helped them get through the 5 week radiotherapy and what was now most important to them. Comments were coded using content analyses. Resultant themes were verified and detailed via focus groups with 8 participants conducted once before and once after DMT. RESULTS: Participants agree that radiotherapy is time to resume participation in groups so as to resume normality. DMT was attractive compared with other psychosocial groups for its physical benefits. Patients were motivated to resume exercise appropriate for them and overcoming the side-effects of preceding chemotherapy; despite painful arms and fear of sweat affecting radiotherapy sites. Patients appreciated both physical and psychosocial benefits of DMT. Physical improvements counteracted side effects of treatments, leading to better sleep and increased wiliness to exercise at home. Psychosocial benefits included released emotions through movement, enhanced cancer coping particularly through radiotherapy, changed attitudes, feeling less alone, etc. CONCLUSIONS: For breast cancer patients, radiotherapy is typically a period when they battle with residual side-effects from chemotherapy or surgery compounded by fears of other side-effects arising from radiotherapy. Yet, seeing an impending end to frequent hospital visits, their budding desire to resume exercise renders body-mind interventions particularly appealing to patients at this stage. Understanding their needs and motivations at unique treatment periods enable the design of appropriate interventions. Nonetheless, patients’ motivation is dampened by not knowing the intensity and type of exercise deemed appropriate. DMT is recommended for patients undergoing radiotherapy for its extensive mental, physical and social therapeutic elements. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF FUNDING: This study is part of a randomized controlled trial funded by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council’s General Research Fund (HKU745110H). We would also like to thank the Hong Kong Cancer Fund, Queen Mary Hospital and Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital, but most of all, participating survivors in this study.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807-
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncologyen_US
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.titleDance Movement Therapy for Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy: A Qualitative Investigation of Motivation, Needs and Benefitsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, HYP: h0205829@hkusua.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KM: irenech@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1099-1611.2013.3394-
dc.identifier.hkuros240671en_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 3en_US
dc.identifier.spage212, abstract no. P2-12en_US
dc.identifier.epage212, abstract no. P2-12en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000325687200002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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