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Article: Memory Recently Retold: The Chinese Historical Writing of the Second Sino-Japanese War and World War II

TitleMemory Recently Retold: The Chinese Historical Writing of the Second Sino-Japanese War and World War II
Authors
KeywordsSecond Sino-Japanese War
World War II
History memory
Historical writing
Issue Date2013
PublisherDavid Publishing Co., Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.davidpublishing.com/journals_info.asp?jId=645
Citation
Sociology Study, 2013, v. 3 n. 9, p. 697-706 How to Cite?
AbstractMemories regarding the history of the Second Sino-Japanese War (1931-1945) and World War II (1939-1945) have always been refreshed in the minds of contemporaries through the retelling of “historical war stories” in various forms including books, posters, films and other media presentations. However, these retellings are often criticised by some academics as distortion of historical facts. This is because many of the present generation of readers and audiences were not even born at the time the events happened. Thus, “historical facts” of this era are, in reality, very vague in people’s minds and their “facts” are often simply a construction of frequently retold “historical war stories” mixed with imagination. This article will argue that even immediately after the end of both wars in 1945, fresh history memory was already distorted, with China being the main victim. Following the end of World War II, there was an extensive publication of books and periodicals about the war. However, through varied interpretations of primary sources and use of visual materials in different ways, various positions were created to suit specific needs for justification of China’s desire to be part of the camp of world powers after 1945. Similar diverse positions were also used to make political arguments criticising both the Axis and Allied Powers for working toward different political ends.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204945
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChoi, SHHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T01:13:54Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T01:13:54Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationSociology Study, 2013, v. 3 n. 9, p. 697-706en_US
dc.identifier.issn2159-5526-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204945-
dc.description.abstractMemories regarding the history of the Second Sino-Japanese War (1931-1945) and World War II (1939-1945) have always been refreshed in the minds of contemporaries through the retelling of “historical war stories” in various forms including books, posters, films and other media presentations. However, these retellings are often criticised by some academics as distortion of historical facts. This is because many of the present generation of readers and audiences were not even born at the time the events happened. Thus, “historical facts” of this era are, in reality, very vague in people’s minds and their “facts” are often simply a construction of frequently retold “historical war stories” mixed with imagination. This article will argue that even immediately after the end of both wars in 1945, fresh history memory was already distorted, with China being the main victim. Following the end of World War II, there was an extensive publication of books and periodicals about the war. However, through varied interpretations of primary sources and use of visual materials in different ways, various positions were created to suit specific needs for justification of China’s desire to be part of the camp of world powers after 1945. Similar diverse positions were also used to make political arguments criticising both the Axis and Allied Powers for working toward different political ends.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDavid Publishing Co., Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.davidpublishing.com/journals_info.asp?jId=645en_US
dc.relation.ispartofSociology Studyen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectSecond Sino-Japanese War-
dc.subjectWorld War II-
dc.subjectHistory memory-
dc.subjectHistorical writing-
dc.titleMemory Recently Retold: The Chinese Historical Writing of the Second Sino-Japanese War and World War IIen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChoi, SHH: cshhenry@hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros238314en_US
dc.identifier.volume3en_US
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spage697en_US
dc.identifier.epage706en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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