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Article: Vagal activity is quadratically related to prosocial traits, prosocial emotions, and observer perceptions of prosociality

TitleVagal activity is quadratically related to prosocial traits, prosocial emotions, and observer perceptions of prosociality
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/psp.html
Citation
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2014, v. 107 n. 6, p. 1051-1063 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the present article, we introduce the quadratic vagal activity-prosociality hypothesis, a theoretical framework for understanding the vagus nerve's involvement in prosociality. We argue that vagus nerve activity supports prosocial behavior by regulating physiological systems that enable emotional expression, empathy for others' mental and emotional states, the regulation of one's own distress, and the experience of positive emotions. However, we contend that extremely high levels of vagal activity can be detrimental to prosociality. We present 3 studies providing support for our model, finding consistent evidence of a quadratic relationship between respiratory sinus arrhythmia--the degree to which the vagus nerve modulates the heart rate--and prosociality. Individual differences in vagal activity were quadratically related to prosocial traits (Study 1), prosocial emotions (Study 2), and outside ratings of prosociality by complete strangers (Study 3). Thus, too much or too little vagal activity appears to be detrimental to prosociality. The present article provides the 1st theoretical and empirical account of the nonlinear relationship between vagal activity and prosociality.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204913
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.736
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.040

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKogan, A-
dc.contributor.authorOveis, C-
dc.contributor.authorCarr, EW-
dc.contributor.authorGruber, J-
dc.contributor.authorMauss, IB-
dc.contributor.authorShallcross, A-
dc.contributor.authorImpett, EA-
dc.contributor.authorvan der Lowe, I-
dc.contributor.authorHui, B-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, C-
dc.contributor.authorKeltner, D-
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T01:04:40Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T01:04:40Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Personality and Social Psychology, 2014, v. 107 n. 6, p. 1051-1063-
dc.identifier.issn0022-3514-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204913-
dc.description.abstractIn the present article, we introduce the quadratic vagal activity-prosociality hypothesis, a theoretical framework for understanding the vagus nerve's involvement in prosociality. We argue that vagus nerve activity supports prosocial behavior by regulating physiological systems that enable emotional expression, empathy for others' mental and emotional states, the regulation of one's own distress, and the experience of positive emotions. However, we contend that extremely high levels of vagal activity can be detrimental to prosociality. We present 3 studies providing support for our model, finding consistent evidence of a quadratic relationship between respiratory sinus arrhythmia--the degree to which the vagus nerve modulates the heart rate--and prosociality. Individual differences in vagal activity were quadratically related to prosocial traits (Study 1), prosocial emotions (Study 2), and outside ratings of prosociality by complete strangers (Study 3). Thus, too much or too little vagal activity appears to be detrimental to prosociality. The present article provides the 1st theoretical and empirical account of the nonlinear relationship between vagal activity and prosociality.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/psp.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Personality and Social Psychology-
dc.rightsJournal of Personality and Social Psychology. Copyright © American Psychological Association.-
dc.titleVagal activity is quadratically related to prosocial traits, prosocial emotions, and observer perceptions of prosociality-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCheng, C: ceccheng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, C=rp00588-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0037509-
dc.identifier.pmid25243414-
dc.identifier.hkuros237175-
dc.identifier.volume107-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage1051-
dc.identifier.epage1063-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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