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Article: Can non-interactive language input benefit young second-language learners?

TitleCan non-interactive language input benefit young second-language learners?
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=JCL
Citation
Journal of Child Language, 2015, v. 42 n. 2, p. 323-350 How to Cite?
AbstractTo fully acquire a language, especially its phonology, children need linguistic input from native speakers early on. When interaction with native speakers is not always possible – e.g. for children learning a second language that is not the societal language – audios are commonly used as an affordable substitute. But does such non-interactive input work? Two experiments evaluated the usefulness of audio storybooks in acquiring a more native-like second-language accent. Young children, first- and second-graders in Hong Kong whose native language was Cantonese Chinese, were given take-home listening assignments in a second language, either English or Putonghua Chinese. Accent ratings of the children's story reading revealed measurable benefits of non-interactive input from native speakers. The benefits were far more robust for Putonghua than English. Implications for second-language accent acquisition are discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204906
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.174
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.787

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAu, TKF-
dc.contributor.authorChan, WWL-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, L-
dc.contributor.authorSiegel, LS-
dc.contributor.authorTso, RVY-
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T01:04:39Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T01:04:39Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Child Language, 2015, v. 42 n. 2, p. 323-350-
dc.identifier.issn0305-0009-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204906-
dc.description.abstractTo fully acquire a language, especially its phonology, children need linguistic input from native speakers early on. When interaction with native speakers is not always possible – e.g. for children learning a second language that is not the societal language – audios are commonly used as an affordable substitute. But does such non-interactive input work? Two experiments evaluated the usefulness of audio storybooks in acquiring a more native-like second-language accent. Young children, first- and second-graders in Hong Kong whose native language was Cantonese Chinese, were given take-home listening assignments in a second language, either English or Putonghua Chinese. Accent ratings of the children's story reading revealed measurable benefits of non-interactive input from native speakers. The benefits were far more robust for Putonghua than English. Implications for second-language accent acquisition are discussed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=JCL-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Child Language-
dc.rightsJournal of Child Language. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleCan non-interactive language input benefit young second-language learners?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailAu, TKF: terryau@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityAu, TKF=rp00580-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0305000913000627-
dc.identifier.pmid24703202-
dc.identifier.hkuros236934-
dc.identifier.hkuros246172-
dc.identifier.volume42-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage323-
dc.identifier.epage350-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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