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Conference Paper: News reading habits of young university students in Hong Kong in the Age of New Media

TitleNews reading habits of young university students in Hong Kong in the Age of New Media
Authors
KeywordsNew media
News reading
Habits
Information behavior
Issue Date2015
PublisherSpringer.
Citation
The 2014 International Conference of the Hong Kong Association for Educational Communications and Technology (HKAECT), Hong Kong, 8-10 December 2014. In New Media, Knowledge Practices and Multiliteracies, 2015, pt. 2, p. 77-87 How to Cite?
AbstractA number of recent studies indicated a rapid increase in the use of mobile devices and apps worldwide. Nevertheless, little research has been done on how the new media affect young adults’ reading habits. The current study addresses this research gap by studying the news reading habits of 118 young university students in Hong Kong in the Internet era. Selected key findings of the study, mainly obtained through analyzing the quantitative data from an online survey, are as follows: (1) smart phone apps were students’ most favorite news source; (2) ease of access was students’ key concern when selecting news sources; (3) students of both genders had a clear preference to local news, followed by international and China news; (4) students’ news reading habits had little to do with their personal income or their parents’ education level; (5) students read news more often and for a longer time if their families had a habit of buying printed newspaper; and (6) students spend less time in news reading when compared to the past. The study also reveals a clear uprising of new media for news access, threatening the role of traditional news sources such as printed newspapers and radio. © Springer International Publishing AG, Part of Springer Science+Business Media
DescriptionConference Theme: Communication and Education: New Media, Knowledge Practices and Multiliteracies
Parallel Paper Presentation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204570
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwan, ACMen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, ICTen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, JHYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T00:04:55Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T00:04:55Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2014 International Conference of the Hong Kong Association for Educational Communications and Technology (HKAECT), Hong Kong, 8-10 December 2014. In New Media, Knowledge Practices and Multiliteracies, 2015, pt. 2, p. 77-87en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-981-287-208-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204570-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Communication and Education: New Media, Knowledge Practices and Multiliteracies-
dc.descriptionParallel Paper Presentation-
dc.description.abstractA number of recent studies indicated a rapid increase in the use of mobile devices and apps worldwide. Nevertheless, little research has been done on how the new media affect young adults’ reading habits. The current study addresses this research gap by studying the news reading habits of 118 young university students in Hong Kong in the Internet era. Selected key findings of the study, mainly obtained through analyzing the quantitative data from an online survey, are as follows: (1) smart phone apps were students’ most favorite news source; (2) ease of access was students’ key concern when selecting news sources; (3) students of both genders had a clear preference to local news, followed by international and China news; (4) students’ news reading habits had little to do with their personal income or their parents’ education level; (5) students read news more often and for a longer time if their families had a habit of buying printed newspaper; and (6) students spend less time in news reading when compared to the past. The study also reveals a clear uprising of new media for news access, threatening the role of traditional news sources such as printed newspapers and radio. © Springer International Publishing AG, Part of Springer Science+Business Mediaen_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofNew Media, Knowledge Practices and Multiliteracies: HKAECT 2014 International Conferenceen_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.comen_US
dc.subjectNew media-
dc.subjectNews reading-
dc.subjectHabits-
dc.subjectInformation behavior-
dc.titleNews reading habits of young university students in Hong Kong in the Age of New Mediaen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailKwan, ACM: cmkwan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-981-287-209-8_8-
dc.identifier.hkuros239153en_US
dc.identifier.issuept. 2-
dc.identifier.spage77-
dc.identifier.epage87-
dc.publisher.placeSingapore-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 141120-

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