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Conference Paper: Why do some students learn better than others in digital game based learning? The role of hope and social support

TitleWhy do some students learn better than others in digital game based learning? The role of hope and social support
Authors
KeywordsHope
Social support
Usability
Digital game based learning
Sex education
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe Center for Information Technology in Education, HKU.
Citation
The 2014 Research Symposium of the Center for Information Technology in Education (CITERS 2014), The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 13-14 June 2014. How to Cite?
AbstractGrowing evidence suggests the technically-enriched educational games can enhance students’ learning motivation and interest. However, a paper that successfully explains the variation in students’ performance in similar setting is still very rare. This study aims to fill in the gap by proposing the question “why do some students learn better than others in the digital game based learning?”. Hong Kong secondary school students (N = 384) participated in the study and answered questionnaires about their psychological factors as well as their overall reflections after playing the digital sexuality education game. Preliminary results suggested that the role of hope and social support predicted the students’ learning outcomes in the game; while taking the mediation role of games usability into account, it partially mediated the relationship between the psychological factors and learning objectives. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.
DescriptionSymposium’s Main Theme : Learning without Limits?
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204512

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaw, WWTen_US
dc.contributor.authorDu, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorKing, RBen_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, SKWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T00:04:49Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T00:04:49Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2014 Research Symposium of the Center for Information Technology in Education (CITERS 2014), The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 13-14 June 2014.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204512-
dc.descriptionSymposium’s Main Theme : Learning without Limits?-
dc.description.abstractGrowing evidence suggests the technically-enriched educational games can enhance students’ learning motivation and interest. However, a paper that successfully explains the variation in students’ performance in similar setting is still very rare. This study aims to fill in the gap by proposing the question “why do some students learn better than others in the digital game based learning?”. Hong Kong secondary school students (N = 384) participated in the study and answered questionnaires about their psychological factors as well as their overall reflections after playing the digital sexuality education game. Preliminary results suggested that the role of hope and social support predicted the students’ learning outcomes in the game; while taking the mediation role of games usability into account, it partially mediated the relationship between the psychological factors and learning objectives. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Center for Information Technology in Education, HKU.-
dc.relation.ispartofCITE Research Symposium, CITERS 2014en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectHope-
dc.subjectSocial support-
dc.subjectUsability-
dc.subjectDigital game based learning-
dc.subjectSex education-
dc.titleWhy do some students learn better than others in digital game based learning? The role of hope and social supporten_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLaw, WWT: wilsonlaw@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailDu, H: hongfei@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKing, RB: h0888060@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChu, SKW: samchu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChu, SKW=rp00897en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros235429en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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