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Conference Paper: Using next-generation whole-exome sequencing approaches to elucidate the genetic basis for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

TitleUsing next-generation whole-exome sequencing approaches to elucidate the genetic basis for nasopharyngeal carcinoma
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
The 2014 Gorden Research Conference on Genomic Instability, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, 6-11 July 2014. How to Cite?
AbstractNasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an intriguing cancer with a high prevalence in Southern Chinese, but is rare in most other parts of the world. In Hong Kong, where this cancer is endemic, NPC is ranked as one of the top cancers in incidence. Its peak age at diagnosis is in the upper 40’s. However, there are patients who develop this cancer at a very early age. Genetic susceptibility to NPC is further indicated by familial clustering, as occurs in at least 10% of the endemic population in Hong Kong. Early-age onset (EAO) and family history-positive (FH+) NPC patients were recruited into this study from Hong Kong and other endemic regions of Southern China, and over seven hundred non-cancerous individuals were included as controls. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) approach was utilized as an unbiased genome-wide screen to identify genes associated with NPC risk in these populations. We hypothesized that these two groups of NPC patients may harbor aberrations in genes associated with chromosomal instability and DNA repair that contribute to the genetic risk of an individual to develop this cancer. Using such an approach, we identified several altered genes in the DNA damage and repair pathways and involved in chromosomal instability in these NPC patients. The results from discovery phase are still being validated by targeted next-generation sequencing in an independent patient cohort and a summary of findings related to genomic instability will be presented.
DescriptionConference Theme: Mechanisms That Cause DNA Damage and Related Diseases
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204417

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDai, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, PCen_US
dc.contributor.authorKo, JMYen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, AKLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLung, MLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T23:38:54Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T23:38:54Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2014 Gorden Research Conference on Genomic Instability, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, 6-11 July 2014.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204417-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Mechanisms That Cause DNA Damage and Related Diseases-
dc.description.abstractNasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an intriguing cancer with a high prevalence in Southern Chinese, but is rare in most other parts of the world. In Hong Kong, where this cancer is endemic, NPC is ranked as one of the top cancers in incidence. Its peak age at diagnosis is in the upper 40’s. However, there are patients who develop this cancer at a very early age. Genetic susceptibility to NPC is further indicated by familial clustering, as occurs in at least 10% of the endemic population in Hong Kong. Early-age onset (EAO) and family history-positive (FH+) NPC patients were recruited into this study from Hong Kong and other endemic regions of Southern China, and over seven hundred non-cancerous individuals were included as controls. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) approach was utilized as an unbiased genome-wide screen to identify genes associated with NPC risk in these populations. We hypothesized that these two groups of NPC patients may harbor aberrations in genes associated with chromosomal instability and DNA repair that contribute to the genetic risk of an individual to develop this cancer. Using such an approach, we identified several altered genes in the DNA damage and repair pathways and involved in chromosomal instability in these NPC patients. The results from discovery phase are still being validated by targeted next-generation sequencing in an independent patient cohort and a summary of findings related to genomic instability will be presented.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGorden Research Conference on Genomic Instabilityen_US
dc.titleUsing next-generation whole-exome sequencing approaches to elucidate the genetic basis for nasopharyngeal carcinomaen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailDai, W: weidai2@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTang, SM: clalatsm@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKo, JMY: joko@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, AKL: arthurhk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLung, ML: mlilung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, AKL=rp01769en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLung, ML=rp00300en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros236726en_US

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