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Conference Paper: Is Disc Degeneration Painful?

TitleIs Disc Degeneration Painful?
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=1351&category_id=90&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=53
Citation
World Forum for Spine Research (WFSR), Xi'an, China,15-17 May 2014. In Global Spine Journal, 2014, v. 4 n. Suppl. 1, p. S142-S143, abstract no. IN2.02 How to Cite?
Abstractaffecting every population. Although LBP can be multifactorial, disc degeneration has been suggested to be a determinant. Disc degeneration is characterized by chemical and morphological changes to the disc, which may usher in changes to its biomechanics, interplay with the endplates and subchondral bone, and may lead to an inflammatory response that can irritate invading nerve fibers. Such changes to the disc and its surrounding area may contribute to pain generation, whose duration and intensity is uncertain. However, a divide is present in epidemiological studies regarding the association of disc degeneration and LBP, leading to the conclusion that disc degeneration is not always synonymous with LBP. This could be attributed to study design, inadequate statistical analyses, and phenotyping issues of degenerative spine changes as well as LBP. In addition, throughout the years, advances in medical imaging have helped broaden the understanding of disc degeneration and imaging pain generators as well the predictive utility of such imaging for future pain development/severity. The evolution of pain genetics research has provided further understanding why some individuals may be more likely to experience pain than others in the setting of degenerative spine changes. Further attention to the phenotyping of spine degeneration has noted that patterns of spine changes may play a role in LBP. The field of OMICSepidemiology and the identification of additional biomarkers (e.g., metabolomics, adipokines, etc.) could further broaden the understanding between the association of disc degeneration and LBP. In addition, the phenotyping of disc degeneration requires further attention, demanding revisitation and reclassification of long-held classification schemes as well as being conscious of a direct link to their clinical relevance. A global standardization of disc degeneration and LBP is needed to help facilitate the collaboration of large-scale consortiums to address such salient spine-related concerns. Disclosure of Interest None declared
DescriptionConference theme: The Intervertebral Disc - from Degeneration to Therapeutic Motion Preservation
Invited Presentation
The abstract can be viewed at http://www.spineresearchforum.org/WFSR_2014_Thieme_AbstractBook_with_Cover.pdf
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204387
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.108

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T22:41:29Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T22:41:29Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationWorld Forum for Spine Research (WFSR), Xi'an, China,15-17 May 2014. In Global Spine Journal, 2014, v. 4 n. Suppl. 1, p. S142-S143, abstract no. IN2.02en_US
dc.identifier.issn2192-5682-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204387-
dc.descriptionConference theme: The Intervertebral Disc - from Degeneration to Therapeutic Motion Preservation-
dc.descriptionInvited Presentation-
dc.descriptionThe abstract can be viewed at http://www.spineresearchforum.org/WFSR_2014_Thieme_AbstractBook_with_Cover.pdf-
dc.description.abstractaffecting every population. Although LBP can be multifactorial, disc degeneration has been suggested to be a determinant. Disc degeneration is characterized by chemical and morphological changes to the disc, which may usher in changes to its biomechanics, interplay with the endplates and subchondral bone, and may lead to an inflammatory response that can irritate invading nerve fibers. Such changes to the disc and its surrounding area may contribute to pain generation, whose duration and intensity is uncertain. However, a divide is present in epidemiological studies regarding the association of disc degeneration and LBP, leading to the conclusion that disc degeneration is not always synonymous with LBP. This could be attributed to study design, inadequate statistical analyses, and phenotyping issues of degenerative spine changes as well as LBP. In addition, throughout the years, advances in medical imaging have helped broaden the understanding of disc degeneration and imaging pain generators as well the predictive utility of such imaging for future pain development/severity. The evolution of pain genetics research has provided further understanding why some individuals may be more likely to experience pain than others in the setting of degenerative spine changes. Further attention to the phenotyping of spine degeneration has noted that patterns of spine changes may play a role in LBP. The field of OMICSepidemiology and the identification of additional biomarkers (e.g., metabolomics, adipokines, etc.) could further broaden the understanding between the association of disc degeneration and LBP. In addition, the phenotyping of disc degeneration requires further attention, demanding revisitation and reclassification of long-held classification schemes as well as being conscious of a direct link to their clinical relevance. A global standardization of disc degeneration and LBP is needed to help facilitate the collaboration of large-scale consortiums to address such salient spine-related concerns. Disclosure of Interest None declared-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=1351&category_id=90&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=53-
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Spine Journalen_US
dc.rightsGlobal Spine Journal. Copyright © Georg Thieme Verlag.-
dc.titleIs Disc Degeneration Painful?en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D: dspine@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros238039en_US
dc.identifier.volume4-
dc.identifier.issueSuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spageS142, abstract no. IN2.02-
dc.identifier.epageS143, abstract no. IN2.02-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US

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