File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

Supplementary

Conference Paper: The Role of Cemented and Press-fit Stem Extension in Repair Tibial Bone Defect in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty — A Finite Element Analysis

TitleThe Role of Cemented and Press-fit Stem Extension in Repair Tibial Bone Defect in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty — A Finite Element Analysis
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.
Citation
The 33rd Annual Congress of the Hong Kong Orthopaedic Association (HKOA), Hong Kong, China, 23-24 November 2013. In the Abstracts of the 33rd Annual Congress of the Hong Kong Orthopaedic Association (HKOA), 2013, p. 2, abstract no. AP01 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Stem extension is commonly used in revision total knee arthroplasty to enhance stability when bone defect is encountered. The present study was conducted to compare the load sharing characteristics and construct stability of the tibial component when using cemented and cementless press-fit stem extensions. Methods: A total of 3 finite element models simulating 5, 7.5, 10, 12.5 and 15 mm height wedge-shaped bone defect in the medial side of tibia plateau were constructed. All defects were repaired by cement with 2 screws reinforcement. Tibial standard implant without long stem, and 45, 60, 75, 90, 115 mm cemented and press-fit stems were simulated. The micromotion between the bone-cement interface was investigated. Results: In all defect models, both cemented and press-fit long stems had greater reduction in the bone-cement interface micromotion than the standard implant. Cemented stems transferred more applied load to diaphyseal bone than the pressfit stem. Cemented stems showed relative lower interface displacement than press-fit stems in all models. When the defect was 12.5 mm, stems longer than 45 mm were required. When the defect was 15 mm, the stems longer than 60 mm were required. Discussion and Conclusion: The use of intramedullary stems aid to supply the initial support for revision implants providing load sharing and increase component stability. Strategy of using different lengths of stems is based on the size of defects.
DescriptionConference Theme: Defying the Aging Spine
Award Papers Session
Concurrent Free Paper 4: Hips and Knees I
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204324

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQiu, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorYan, CHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, WWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChiu, PKYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T22:41:13Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T22:41:13Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 33rd Annual Congress of the Hong Kong Orthopaedic Association (HKOA), Hong Kong, China, 23-24 November 2013. In the Abstracts of the 33rd Annual Congress of the Hong Kong Orthopaedic Association (HKOA), 2013, p. 2, abstract no. AP01en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204324-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Defying the Aging Spine-
dc.descriptionAward Papers Session-
dc.descriptionConcurrent Free Paper 4: Hips and Knees I-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Stem extension is commonly used in revision total knee arthroplasty to enhance stability when bone defect is encountered. The present study was conducted to compare the load sharing characteristics and construct stability of the tibial component when using cemented and cementless press-fit stem extensions. Methods: A total of 3 finite element models simulating 5, 7.5, 10, 12.5 and 15 mm height wedge-shaped bone defect in the medial side of tibia plateau were constructed. All defects were repaired by cement with 2 screws reinforcement. Tibial standard implant without long stem, and 45, 60, 75, 90, 115 mm cemented and press-fit stems were simulated. The micromotion between the bone-cement interface was investigated. Results: In all defect models, both cemented and press-fit long stems had greater reduction in the bone-cement interface micromotion than the standard implant. Cemented stems transferred more applied load to diaphyseal bone than the pressfit stem. Cemented stems showed relative lower interface displacement than press-fit stems in all models. When the defect was 12.5 mm, stems longer than 45 mm were required. When the defect was 15 mm, the stems longer than 60 mm were required. Discussion and Conclusion: The use of intramedullary stems aid to supply the initial support for revision implants providing load sharing and increase component stability. Strategy of using different lengths of stems is based on the size of defects.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Congress of the Hong Kong Orthopaedic Association (HKOA)en_US
dc.rightsAnnual Congress of the Hong Kong Orthopaedic Association (HKOA). Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.titleThe Role of Cemented and Press-fit Stem Extension in Repair Tibial Bone Defect in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty — A Finite Element Analysisen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailYan, CH: yanchoi@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLu, WW: wwlu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChiu, PKY: pkychiu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYan, CH=rp00303en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLu, WW=rp00411en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChiu, PKY=rp00379en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros235748en_US
dc.identifier.spage2, abstract no. AP01en_US
dc.identifier.epage2, abstract no. AP01en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong, China-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats