File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Loading-Induced Stress Response in the Intervertebral Disc

TitleLoading-Induced Stress Response in the Intervertebral Disc
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=1351&category_id=90&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=53
Citation
World Forum for Spine Research (WFSR), Xi'an, China,15-17 May 2014. In Global Spine Journal, 2014, v. 4 n. Suppl. 1, p. S52, abstract no. PO.030 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction Previous research has been done to study the effect of mechanical loading on intervertebral disc (IVD) cells. However, few studies have investigated in whether the IVD cells perceive mechanical loading as stress and respond by expression of stress response proteins such as heat shock proteins (HSP). Studies have shown that stress response can be seen in cell line chondrocytes under hydrostatic pressure. On the other hand, studies have also shown that expression of heat shock protein-72 (HSP72) and HSP27was associated with disc degeneration and IVD cells can secrete HSP70 in response to oxidative stress. This study aims to study the stress response in the IVD in response to compressive loading and whether the disc cells are able to adapt to the loading. The outcome of the study will help to understand how the disc cells adapt or cope with mechanical stress. Materials and Methods Fresh adult bovine caudal discs were harvested and cultured with dynamic compressive loading applied at physiological range magnitude, 0.1 to 0.6 MPa. The culture condition was such that the discs underwent 2 hours of dynamic loading, followed by 22 hours of resting for 2 days. Samples were retrieved at different time points: right after loading (Dyna) and right after resting (DyNa+rest). Positive control discs were put under static loading (0.35 MPa, static) and heat shock (43° C, HS) exposed for 2 h/d during 2 days and gene expression was quantified right after the treatments. Both nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) were retrieved for gene expression study of the cellular stress response genes. HSP72 and heat shock factor-1 (HSF1). HSP72 is the general stress response protein which is upregulated in the cell in response to stress while HSF1 is the transcriptional factor of HSP72. The expression was normalized to free swelling control. Results In the NP of the bovine disc, both positive controls (HS and static) expressed high level of HSP72, confirming their expression in the NP tissues and their response to stress. For the experimental groups, the expression of HSP72 was upregulated after loading, decreased after resting but was again increased after second round of loading at day 2. On the other hand, HSF1 expression increased after resting in the day 1 loading and peaked at day 2 after loading. For the AF tissues, the expression of HSF1 was low in most of the groups including the positive control, even the HSP72 expression was high in these two groups. The expression of HSP72 in AF tissues was decreasing with both resting and an additional round of loading. The pattern of HSF1 expression of AF tissues was similar to the NP tissues where the expression was the highest 2 days after loading. Conclusion This study showed that the IVD cells do upregulate the stress response proteins expression in response to loading induced stress. The cells express HSP72 in response to the stress while HSF1 may have a slower and transient expression. The increase in HSP72 and HSF1 expression after two rounds of loading may indicate more cycles are needed to see whether there is adaptation in stress response induced by mechanical loading. Disclosure of Interest None declared
DescriptionConference theme: The Intervertebral Disc - from Degeneration to Therapeutic Motion Preservation
The abstract can be viewed at http://www.spineresearchforum.org/WFSR_2014_Thieme_AbstractBook_with_Cover.pdf
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204253
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.108

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChooi, WHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, SCWen_US
dc.contributor.authorGantenbein-Ritter, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, BPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T21:26:57Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T21:26:57Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationWorld Forum for Spine Research (WFSR), Xi'an, China,15-17 May 2014. In Global Spine Journal, 2014, v. 4 n. Suppl. 1, p. S52, abstract no. PO.030en_US
dc.identifier.issn2192-5682-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204253-
dc.descriptionConference theme: The Intervertebral Disc - from Degeneration to Therapeutic Motion Preservation-
dc.descriptionThe abstract can be viewed at http://www.spineresearchforum.org/WFSR_2014_Thieme_AbstractBook_with_Cover.pdf-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Previous research has been done to study the effect of mechanical loading on intervertebral disc (IVD) cells. However, few studies have investigated in whether the IVD cells perceive mechanical loading as stress and respond by expression of stress response proteins such as heat shock proteins (HSP). Studies have shown that stress response can be seen in cell line chondrocytes under hydrostatic pressure. On the other hand, studies have also shown that expression of heat shock protein-72 (HSP72) and HSP27was associated with disc degeneration and IVD cells can secrete HSP70 in response to oxidative stress. This study aims to study the stress response in the IVD in response to compressive loading and whether the disc cells are able to adapt to the loading. The outcome of the study will help to understand how the disc cells adapt or cope with mechanical stress. Materials and Methods Fresh adult bovine caudal discs were harvested and cultured with dynamic compressive loading applied at physiological range magnitude, 0.1 to 0.6 MPa. The culture condition was such that the discs underwent 2 hours of dynamic loading, followed by 22 hours of resting for 2 days. Samples were retrieved at different time points: right after loading (Dyna) and right after resting (DyNa+rest). Positive control discs were put under static loading (0.35 MPa, static) and heat shock (43° C, HS) exposed for 2 h/d during 2 days and gene expression was quantified right after the treatments. Both nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) were retrieved for gene expression study of the cellular stress response genes. HSP72 and heat shock factor-1 (HSF1). HSP72 is the general stress response protein which is upregulated in the cell in response to stress while HSF1 is the transcriptional factor of HSP72. The expression was normalized to free swelling control. Results In the NP of the bovine disc, both positive controls (HS and static) expressed high level of HSP72, confirming their expression in the NP tissues and their response to stress. For the experimental groups, the expression of HSP72 was upregulated after loading, decreased after resting but was again increased after second round of loading at day 2. On the other hand, HSF1 expression increased after resting in the day 1 loading and peaked at day 2 after loading. For the AF tissues, the expression of HSF1 was low in most of the groups including the positive control, even the HSP72 expression was high in these two groups. The expression of HSP72 in AF tissues was decreasing with both resting and an additional round of loading. The pattern of HSF1 expression of AF tissues was similar to the NP tissues where the expression was the highest 2 days after loading. Conclusion This study showed that the IVD cells do upregulate the stress response proteins expression in response to loading induced stress. The cells express HSP72 in response to the stress while HSF1 may have a slower and transient expression. The increase in HSP72 and HSF1 expression after two rounds of loading may indicate more cycles are needed to see whether there is adaptation in stress response induced by mechanical loading. Disclosure of Interest None declared-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=1351&category_id=90&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=53-
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Spine Journalen_US
dc.rightsGlobal Spine Journal. Copyright © Georg Thieme Verlag.-
dc.titleLoading-Induced Stress Response in the Intervertebral Discen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, BP: bpchan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, BP=rp00087en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros239679en_US
dc.identifier.volume4-
dc.identifier.issueSuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spageS52, abstract no. PO.030en_US
dc.identifier.epageS52, abstract no. PO.030en_US
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats