File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL

Conference Paper: Engineering a Multicomponent Spinal Motion Segment-Like Construct from Mesenchymal Stem Cells

TitleEngineering a Multicomponent Spinal Motion Segment-Like Construct from Mesenchymal Stem Cells
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=1351&category_id=90&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=53
Citation
World Forum for Spine Research (WFSR), Xi'an, China,15-17 May 2014. In Global Spine Journal, 2014, v. 4 n. Suppl. 1, p. S35-S36, abstract no. OR10.05 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction The task of engineering the intervertebral disc is challenging as the complex tissue needs to integrate with the host tissue and performits function after the implantation. The vertebrae connected to the endplates are essential to integrate with the host vertebrae tissue which had been shown by Luk et al in whole disc transplantation.1 Hence, engineering the complex tissue needs to integrate the different components of the vertebrae (VB), cartilaginous endplate (CEP), nucleus pulposus (NP), and annulus fibrosus (AF); both biologically and mechanically. In this study, the multiple component spinal motion segments were fabricated by integrating these components. The construct was then loaded in a bioreactor and supplied with mechanical and biological stimulation. The functional aspect of the fabricated endplate-like construct was evaluated by a permeability test. Materials and Methods Rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were encapsulated in collagen and induced to differentiate toward osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages before fabricating trilayered osteochondral (OC) constructs as previously mentioned. To test the nutritional function of the OC construct which acts as the endplate, rabbit nucleus pulposus cells (rNPCs)-encapsulated collagen microspheres were trapped in a sealed chamber formed with the OC construct such that the nutrients have to diffuse through the OC construct to reach the inside of the chamber. Cell viability of the rNPCs was then evaluated. To fabricate the multiple component construct, a rMSCs encapsulated collagen-GAG precipitate was added in between two OC construct and placed in between the shaft of the bioreactor. Then a layer of rMSC encapsulated collagen was formed around the construct to form the AF-like lamella. Torsional loading was applied onto the construct to study its effect on cell alignment in the AF-like lamella. Finally, one to three layers of AF-like lamellae were added to the spinal motion segment construct and cultured in the bioreactor with complex loading for 14 days. Histological, ultrastructural, and mechanical evaluation was done on the construct. Results In the custom developed functionality test for nutrient transport, the rNPCs in the chamber were viable at the end of the culture showed that nutrientswere able to diffuse through the OC construct. For the effect of torsional loading on cell alignment in the AF-like lamella, alignment analysis showed that the cells were aligned along a preferred axis under torsional loading compared with control group without loading. However, no collagen fibers alignment was found in this study. The multiple component construct was fabricated with each component similar to the spinal motion segment. The different components of the construct were well integrated throughout the culture and were shown by histology. Mean torsional stiffness of the constructs significantly increased as the number of rMSC encapsulated AF-like layer increased. Conclusion This study demonstrated the feasibility to engineer a spinal motion segment-like tissue with collagen and MSC. The OC constructs demonstrated its nutritional function and can be used as a vertebra-endplate construct in this model. rMSC encapsulated in collagen gel can be induced to re-orientate and align in a certain direction by applying cyclic torsional force on the tubular structure. This can be a tissue engineered model to study the effects of various strategies in functional remodeling and maturation of the intervertebral disc. Disclosure of Interest None declared Reference 1. Luk KD, Ruan DK. Intervertebral disc transplantation: a biological approach to motion preservation. Eur Spine J 2008;17(Suppl 4):504–510
DescriptionConference theme: The Intervertebral Disc - from Degeneration to Therapeutic Motion Preservation
Oral Presentation
The abstract can be viewed at http://www.spineresearchforum.org/WFSR_2014_Thieme_AbstractBook_with_Cover.pdf
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204252
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.108

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChik, TKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChooi, WHen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, HWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChoy, THAen_US
dc.contributor.authorSze, KYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDKen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, BPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T21:26:57Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T21:26:57Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationWorld Forum for Spine Research (WFSR), Xi'an, China,15-17 May 2014. In Global Spine Journal, 2014, v. 4 n. Suppl. 1, p. S35-S36, abstract no. OR10.05en_US
dc.identifier.issn2192-5682-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/204252-
dc.descriptionConference theme: The Intervertebral Disc - from Degeneration to Therapeutic Motion Preservation-
dc.descriptionOral Presentation-
dc.descriptionThe abstract can be viewed at http://www.spineresearchforum.org/WFSR_2014_Thieme_AbstractBook_with_Cover.pdf-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction The task of engineering the intervertebral disc is challenging as the complex tissue needs to integrate with the host tissue and performits function after the implantation. The vertebrae connected to the endplates are essential to integrate with the host vertebrae tissue which had been shown by Luk et al in whole disc transplantation.1 Hence, engineering the complex tissue needs to integrate the different components of the vertebrae (VB), cartilaginous endplate (CEP), nucleus pulposus (NP), and annulus fibrosus (AF); both biologically and mechanically. In this study, the multiple component spinal motion segments were fabricated by integrating these components. The construct was then loaded in a bioreactor and supplied with mechanical and biological stimulation. The functional aspect of the fabricated endplate-like construct was evaluated by a permeability test. Materials and Methods Rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were encapsulated in collagen and induced to differentiate toward osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages before fabricating trilayered osteochondral (OC) constructs as previously mentioned. To test the nutritional function of the OC construct which acts as the endplate, rabbit nucleus pulposus cells (rNPCs)-encapsulated collagen microspheres were trapped in a sealed chamber formed with the OC construct such that the nutrients have to diffuse through the OC construct to reach the inside of the chamber. Cell viability of the rNPCs was then evaluated. To fabricate the multiple component construct, a rMSCs encapsulated collagen-GAG precipitate was added in between two OC construct and placed in between the shaft of the bioreactor. Then a layer of rMSC encapsulated collagen was formed around the construct to form the AF-like lamella. Torsional loading was applied onto the construct to study its effect on cell alignment in the AF-like lamella. Finally, one to three layers of AF-like lamellae were added to the spinal motion segment construct and cultured in the bioreactor with complex loading for 14 days. Histological, ultrastructural, and mechanical evaluation was done on the construct. Results In the custom developed functionality test for nutrient transport, the rNPCs in the chamber were viable at the end of the culture showed that nutrientswere able to diffuse through the OC construct. For the effect of torsional loading on cell alignment in the AF-like lamella, alignment analysis showed that the cells were aligned along a preferred axis under torsional loading compared with control group without loading. However, no collagen fibers alignment was found in this study. The multiple component construct was fabricated with each component similar to the spinal motion segment. The different components of the construct were well integrated throughout the culture and were shown by histology. Mean torsional stiffness of the constructs significantly increased as the number of rMSC encapsulated AF-like layer increased. Conclusion This study demonstrated the feasibility to engineer a spinal motion segment-like tissue with collagen and MSC. The OC constructs demonstrated its nutritional function and can be used as a vertebra-endplate construct in this model. rMSC encapsulated in collagen gel can be induced to re-orientate and align in a certain direction by applying cyclic torsional force on the tubular structure. This can be a tissue engineered model to study the effects of various strategies in functional remodeling and maturation of the intervertebral disc. Disclosure of Interest None declared Reference 1. Luk KD, Ruan DK. Intervertebral disc transplantation: a biological approach to motion preservation. Eur Spine J 2008;17(Suppl 4):504–510-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=1351&category_id=90&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=53-
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Spine Journalen_US
dc.rightsGlobal Spine Journal. Copyright © Georg Thieme Verlag.-
dc.titleEngineering a Multicomponent Spinal Motion Segment-Like Construct from Mesenchymal Stem Cellsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChik, TK: tkchik@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheng, HW: vernty@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChoy, THA: thachoy@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSze, KY: kysze@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK: hrmoldk@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC: cheungmc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, BP: bpchan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySze, KY=rp00171en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KMC=rp00387en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, BP=rp00087en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros239677en_US
dc.identifier.volume4-
dc.identifier.issueSuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spageS35, abstract no. OR10.05en_US
dc.identifier.epageS36, abstract no. OR10.05en_US
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats