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Conference Paper: Assessment of the Neurocentral Synchondrosis in Pediatric Spines and the 'Developmental' Etiology of Schmorl Nodes

TitleAssessment of the Neurocentral Synchondrosis in Pediatric Spines and the 'Developmental' Etiology of Schmorl Nodes
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=1351&category_id=90&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=53
Citation
World Forum for Spine Research (WFSR), Xi'an, China,15-17 May 2014. In Global Spine Journal, 2014, v. 4 n. Suppl. 1, p. S36-S37, abstract no. PO.002 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction Schmorl nodes of the thoracolumbar region have been associated with the presence and severity of disc degeneration in adults. The etiology of Schmorl nodes remains precarious; however, a unique multilevel phenotype of “kissing” nodes seems to suggest a developmental origin. The neurocentral synchondrosis (NCS) are cartilaginous growth plates near the neural arch ossification centers in a growing vertebrae that may play a direct role in the development of endplate abnormalities, such as Schmorl nodes. This study assessed the NCSin pediatric spines to raise discussion of a developmental component of Schmorl nodes. Materials and Methods A retrospective imaging study of pediatric patients at a single institute assessed over a 5-year period (age range: 0-10 years) was performed. Patients with spinal disorders (e.g., scoliosis) were excluded. A total of 102 patients (57 males and 45 females) and a total of 113 sets of MRI images were reviewed. The thoracolumbar regions (T12-S1) were evaluated. Sagittal T1- and T2-weighted imageswere assessed for the presence or absence of the NCS, defined as a hypointense vertical line located between the vertebral body anteriorly and the posterior arch. The presence of Schmorl nodes was also noted. Results NCS was noted in 46% of the MRIs. No statistically significant difference in the disappearance of the NCS between different age groups (p ¼ 0.063) or gender (p ¼ 0.706) was found. The NCS was noted to be completely fused at the midpoint of the vertebrae. Indentation of the vertebral endplates resembling Schmorl node at many of the rostral and caudal ends of the unfused NCS were observed (Fig. 1). Conclusion The significance of further characterizing the nature of NCS closure may lie in potential associations with failure of complete closure with endplate abnormalities, such as Schmorl nodes. Our MRI study provides a foundation that a development etiology of Schmorl nodes exists. Disclosure of Interest None declared
DescriptionConference theme: The Intervertebral Disc - from Degeneration to Therapeutic Motion Preservation
Poster presentation
The abstract can be viewed at http://www.spineresearchforum.org/WFSR_2014_Thieme_AbstractBook_with_Cover.pdf
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203989
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.108

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaw, TKen_US
dc.contributor.authorAnthony, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T19:48:26Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T19:48:26Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationWorld Forum for Spine Research (WFSR), Xi'an, China,15-17 May 2014. In Global Spine Journal, 2014, v. 4 n. Suppl. 1, p. S36-S37, abstract no. PO.002en_US
dc.identifier.issn2192-5682-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203989-
dc.descriptionConference theme: The Intervertebral Disc - from Degeneration to Therapeutic Motion Preservation-
dc.descriptionPoster presentation-
dc.descriptionThe abstract can be viewed at http://www.spineresearchforum.org/WFSR_2014_Thieme_AbstractBook_with_Cover.pdf-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Schmorl nodes of the thoracolumbar region have been associated with the presence and severity of disc degeneration in adults. The etiology of Schmorl nodes remains precarious; however, a unique multilevel phenotype of “kissing” nodes seems to suggest a developmental origin. The neurocentral synchondrosis (NCS) are cartilaginous growth plates near the neural arch ossification centers in a growing vertebrae that may play a direct role in the development of endplate abnormalities, such as Schmorl nodes. This study assessed the NCSin pediatric spines to raise discussion of a developmental component of Schmorl nodes. Materials and Methods A retrospective imaging study of pediatric patients at a single institute assessed over a 5-year period (age range: 0-10 years) was performed. Patients with spinal disorders (e.g., scoliosis) were excluded. A total of 102 patients (57 males and 45 females) and a total of 113 sets of MRI images were reviewed. The thoracolumbar regions (T12-S1) were evaluated. Sagittal T1- and T2-weighted imageswere assessed for the presence or absence of the NCS, defined as a hypointense vertical line located between the vertebral body anteriorly and the posterior arch. The presence of Schmorl nodes was also noted. Results NCS was noted in 46% of the MRIs. No statistically significant difference in the disappearance of the NCS between different age groups (p ¼ 0.063) or gender (p ¼ 0.706) was found. The NCS was noted to be completely fused at the midpoint of the vertebrae. Indentation of the vertebral endplates resembling Schmorl node at many of the rostral and caudal ends of the unfused NCS were observed (Fig. 1). Conclusion The significance of further characterizing the nature of NCS closure may lie in potential associations with failure of complete closure with endplate abnormalities, such as Schmorl nodes. Our MRI study provides a foundation that a development etiology of Schmorl nodes exists. Disclosure of Interest None declared-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=1351&category_id=90&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=53-
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Spine Journalen_US
dc.rightsGlobal Spine Journal. Copyright © Georg Thieme Verlag.-
dc.titleAssessment of the Neurocentral Synchondrosis in Pediatric Spines and the 'Developmental' Etiology of Schmorl Nodesen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK: hrmoldk@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailAnthony, M: anthonym@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D: dspine@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333en_US
dc.identifier.authorityAnthony, M=rp01302en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros238037en_US
dc.identifier.volume4-
dc.identifier.issueSuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spageS36, abstract no. PO.002-
dc.identifier.epageS37, abstract no. PO.002-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US

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