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Conference Paper: Are There Protective Genes for Disc Degeneration?

TitleAre There Protective Genes for Disc Degeneration?
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=1351&category_id=90&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=53
Citation
World Forum for Spine Research (WFSR), Xi'an, China,15-17 May 2014. In Global Spine Journal, 2014, v. 4 n. Suppl. 1, p. S146-S147, abstract no. IN4.02 How to Cite?
AbstractIntervertebral disc degeneration is a major cause of back pain with a huge impact to the quality of life as we age. It is clear from studies that there is a significant genetic contribution to the susceptibility of an individual to disc degeneration. Indeed, several genetic risk factors have been identified that included extracellular matrix proteins and enzymes that modify these proteins. These genetic risk factors interact with the environment that impact on the onset, severity, and symptomatic outcomes. In a population study in Hong Kong, whereas over 90% of most people will succumb to some form of disc degeneration by the age of 50 years, there are individuals who showed no indication of disc degeneration by MRI suggesting the possibility of “protective factors,” either genetic and/or environmental.1 It is likely that genetics would play a role in protective mechanisms. It is possible to study potential protective genes in human using case-control association studies, but it would require the collection of a very large cohort of “protected” individuals. Another approach is to study in animal models and mapped the identified loci to the human genome. In mice, there are “super healer” strains with superior healing potentials of damaged tissues including elastic cartilage of the ear and hyaline cartilage of synovial joints.2 Whether these healing potentials translate to protective mechanisms of the intervertebral disc is not clear and has not been studied. Our initial analysis comparing good healer (Lg/J and MRL) with poor healer (Sm/J and C57B) strains of mice suggests that there should be protective genes influencing the homeostasis of the nucleus pulposus and the annulus fibrosus. A gene discovery study has been performed for knee joint cartilage repair in these mice and potential genetic loci for improved cartilage repair identified.3,4 Thus, with the establishment of appropriate phenotypic traits for the intervertebral disc, it is possible to search for protective/repair genes for the disc. There should be “protective genes”; what is important is finding the appropriate animal models and human cohorts for genetic studies and validation. Focusing on protective genes and understanding the molecular and cellular controls involved in delaying the onset and progression of intervertebral disc degeneration may serve to be a better approach in developing therapeutic treatments and preventative strategies. Disclosure of Interest None declared References 1. Jim JJ, Noponen-Hietala N, Cheung KM, et al. The TRP2 allele of COL9A2 is an age-dependent risk factor for the development and severity of intervertebral disc degeneration. Spine 2005;30(24):2735–2742 2. Fitzgerald J, Rich C, Burkhardt D, Allen J, Herzka AS, Little CB. Evidence for articular cartilage regeneration in MRL/MpJ mice. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2008;16(11):1319–1326 3. Rai MF, Hashimoto S, Johnson EE, et al. Heritability of articular cartilage regeneration and its association with ear wound healing in mice. Arthritis Rheum 2012;64(7):2300–2310 4. Rai MF, Schmidt EJ, McAlinden A, Cheverud JM, Sandell LJ. Molecular insight into the association between cartilage regeneration and ear wound healing in genetic mouse models: targeting new genes in regeneration. G3 (Bethesda) 2013;3(11):1881–1891
DescriptionConference theme: The Intervertebral Disc - from Degeneration to Therapeutic Motion Preservation
Session S4: Disc Degeneration I Genetics
The abstract can be viewed at http://www.spineresearchforum.org/WFSR_2014_Thieme_AbstractBook_with_Cover.pdf
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203903
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.108

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorXiong, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, WCWen_US
dc.contributor.authorTam, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorSakai, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T16:43:19Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T16:43:19Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationWorld Forum for Spine Research (WFSR), Xi'an, China,15-17 May 2014. In Global Spine Journal, 2014, v. 4 n. Suppl. 1, p. S146-S147, abstract no. IN4.02en_US
dc.identifier.issn2192-5682-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203903-
dc.descriptionConference theme: The Intervertebral Disc - from Degeneration to Therapeutic Motion Preservation-
dc.descriptionSession S4: Disc Degeneration I Genetics-
dc.descriptionThe abstract can be viewed at http://www.spineresearchforum.org/WFSR_2014_Thieme_AbstractBook_with_Cover.pdf-
dc.description.abstractIntervertebral disc degeneration is a major cause of back pain with a huge impact to the quality of life as we age. It is clear from studies that there is a significant genetic contribution to the susceptibility of an individual to disc degeneration. Indeed, several genetic risk factors have been identified that included extracellular matrix proteins and enzymes that modify these proteins. These genetic risk factors interact with the environment that impact on the onset, severity, and symptomatic outcomes. In a population study in Hong Kong, whereas over 90% of most people will succumb to some form of disc degeneration by the age of 50 years, there are individuals who showed no indication of disc degeneration by MRI suggesting the possibility of “protective factors,” either genetic and/or environmental.1 It is likely that genetics would play a role in protective mechanisms. It is possible to study potential protective genes in human using case-control association studies, but it would require the collection of a very large cohort of “protected” individuals. Another approach is to study in animal models and mapped the identified loci to the human genome. In mice, there are “super healer” strains with superior healing potentials of damaged tissues including elastic cartilage of the ear and hyaline cartilage of synovial joints.2 Whether these healing potentials translate to protective mechanisms of the intervertebral disc is not clear and has not been studied. Our initial analysis comparing good healer (Lg/J and MRL) with poor healer (Sm/J and C57B) strains of mice suggests that there should be protective genes influencing the homeostasis of the nucleus pulposus and the annulus fibrosus. A gene discovery study has been performed for knee joint cartilage repair in these mice and potential genetic loci for improved cartilage repair identified.3,4 Thus, with the establishment of appropriate phenotypic traits for the intervertebral disc, it is possible to search for protective/repair genes for the disc. There should be “protective genes”; what is important is finding the appropriate animal models and human cohorts for genetic studies and validation. Focusing on protective genes and understanding the molecular and cellular controls involved in delaying the onset and progression of intervertebral disc degeneration may serve to be a better approach in developing therapeutic treatments and preventative strategies. Disclosure of Interest None declared References 1. Jim JJ, Noponen-Hietala N, Cheung KM, et al. The TRP2 allele of COL9A2 is an age-dependent risk factor for the development and severity of intervertebral disc degeneration. Spine 2005;30(24):2735–2742 2. Fitzgerald J, Rich C, Burkhardt D, Allen J, Herzka AS, Little CB. Evidence for articular cartilage regeneration in MRL/MpJ mice. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2008;16(11):1319–1326 3. Rai MF, Hashimoto S, Johnson EE, et al. Heritability of articular cartilage regeneration and its association with ear wound healing in mice. Arthritis Rheum 2012;64(7):2300–2310 4. Rai MF, Schmidt EJ, McAlinden A, Cheverud JM, Sandell LJ. Molecular insight into the association between cartilage regeneration and ear wound healing in genetic mouse models: targeting new genes in regeneration. G3 (Bethesda) 2013;3(11):1881–1891-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherGeorg Thieme Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.thieme.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=1351&category_id=90&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=53-
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Spine Journalen_US
dc.rightsGlobal Spine Journal. Copyright © Georg Thieme Verlag.-
dc.titleAre There Protective Genes for Disc Degeneration?en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailXiong, C: serenaxc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, WCW: cwilson@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTam, V: vivtam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, D: chand@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, D=rp00540en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros240472en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros237731-
dc.identifier.volume4-
dc.identifier.issueSuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spageS146, abstract no. IN4.02-
dc.identifier.epageS147, abstract no. IN4.02-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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