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Article: The impact of shadow education on student academic achievement: Why the research is inconclusive and what can be done about it

TitleThe impact of shadow education on student academic achievement: Why the research is inconclusive and what can be done about it
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/education/journal/12564
Citation
Asia Pacific Education Review, 2014, v. 15 n. 3, p. 381-389 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent decades have brought global expansion of private supplementary tutoring, widely known as shadow education. Such tutoring consumes considerable resources and is usually viewed by participating households as an investment that will increase the recipients’ academic achievements. However, research on the effectiveness of tutoring has delivered inconclusive and even contradictory findings. Part of the reason lies in definitions and foci of research, since private supplementary tutoring may have many different formats, delivery mechanisms and intensities. As with other types of education, it is important also to investigate the qualities of the instructors and the motivations of the students. This creates a complex research arena, in which practical challenges arise from shortcomings in the instruments for securing data and limitations in methods for analyzing the data. This paper assesses the current state of the literature and makes recommendations for the future research agenda.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203477
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBray, TMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T15:16:52Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T15:16:52Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationAsia Pacific Education Review, 2014, v. 15 n. 3, p. 381-389en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203477-
dc.description.abstractRecent decades have brought global expansion of private supplementary tutoring, widely known as shadow education. Such tutoring consumes considerable resources and is usually viewed by participating households as an investment that will increase the recipients’ academic achievements. However, research on the effectiveness of tutoring has delivered inconclusive and even contradictory findings. Part of the reason lies in definitions and foci of research, since private supplementary tutoring may have many different formats, delivery mechanisms and intensities. As with other types of education, it is important also to investigate the qualities of the instructors and the motivations of the students. This creates a complex research arena, in which practical challenges arise from shortcomings in the instruments for securing data and limitations in methods for analyzing the data. This paper assesses the current state of the literature and makes recommendations for the future research agenda.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/education/journal/12564-
dc.relation.ispartofAsia Pacific Education Reviewen_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleThe impact of shadow education on student academic achievement: Why the research is inconclusive and what can be done about iten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailBray, TM: mbray@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBray, TM=rp00888en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12564-014-9326-9en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros238388en_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.spage381en_US
dc.identifier.epage389en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000340518100006-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US

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