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Article: Policing the Southern Chinese Seaboard

TitlePolicing the Southern Chinese Seaboard
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSpringer.
Citation
Crime, Law & Social Change, 2014, v. 61, p. 369-375 How to Cite?
AbstractFor scholars of crime, law and social change, one of the more interesting aspects of globalization is the way it produces new regulatory regimes. Markets, it seems, are not natural forces; they must be created. And the creation of a new market depends, in no small part, on the formation of a governing system capable of securing its new forms of property, rationalizing its new relations of domination, and organizing its new system of exchange. The emergence of a new regulatory regime is fascinating to watch anywhere, but perhaps the most intriguing place in which to explore the process is one of the sort that Mary Louise Pratt called “contact zones” [1], i.e. sites in which radically different economies of meaning encounter one another, find a footing for engagement across their differences, and set about exploiting the new possibilities afforded by combination and hybridity.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203399
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMartin, JTen_US
dc.contributor.authorManning, PKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T15:07:47Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T15:07:47Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationCrime, Law & Social Change, 2014, v. 61, p. 369-375en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203399-
dc.description.abstractFor scholars of crime, law and social change, one of the more interesting aspects of globalization is the way it produces new regulatory regimes. Markets, it seems, are not natural forces; they must be created. And the creation of a new market depends, in no small part, on the formation of a governing system capable of securing its new forms of property, rationalizing its new relations of domination, and organizing its new system of exchange. The emergence of a new regulatory regime is fascinating to watch anywhere, but perhaps the most intriguing place in which to explore the process is one of the sort that Mary Louise Pratt called “contact zones” [1], i.e. sites in which radically different economies of meaning encounter one another, find a footing for engagement across their differences, and set about exploiting the new possibilities afforded by combination and hybridity.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofCrime, Law & Social Changeen_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.comen_US
dc.titlePolicing the Southern Chinese Seaboarden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMartin, JT: jtmartin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMartin, JT=rp00870en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10611-013-9498-yen_US
dc.identifier.hkuros236539en_US
dc.identifier.volume61en_US
dc.identifier.spage369en_US
dc.identifier.epage375en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000336389400001-

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