File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Thinking about Transitional Justice in Myanmar

TitleThinking about Transitional Justice in Myanmar
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherIP Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ippublishing.com/general_asia.htm
Citation
South East Asia Research, 2014, v. 22, p. 183-200 How to Cite?
AbstractIn recent decades, transitional justice has featured on the political agenda of many post-authoritarian states. In Myanmar, where a partial but palpable transition is currently taking place, accounting for a dark past and securing a democratic future are key demands of opposition groups. However, elite-led reforms implemented after a March 2011 switch to quasi-civilian rule pay little attention to justice. This article thus surveys the possibilities for transitional justice in Myanmar, highlighting six major options: criminal prosecutions, a truth commission, a lustration programme, a reparations programme, a memory project and symbolic measures. Procedurally, the paper argues for local leadership supported by external engagement designed to ensure that basic global standards are met. Substantively, it explores tensions within transitional justice and across the wider reform process when such an agenda is pursued. To close, it holds that, while transitional justice may take years to gain a secure foothold in Myanmar, robust foundations should be laid now.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203348

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHolliday, IMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T14:13:26Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T14:13:26Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationSouth East Asia Research, 2014, v. 22, p. 183-200en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203348-
dc.description.abstractIn recent decades, transitional justice has featured on the political agenda of many post-authoritarian states. In Myanmar, where a partial but palpable transition is currently taking place, accounting for a dark past and securing a democratic future are key demands of opposition groups. However, elite-led reforms implemented after a March 2011 switch to quasi-civilian rule pay little attention to justice. This article thus surveys the possibilities for transitional justice in Myanmar, highlighting six major options: criminal prosecutions, a truth commission, a lustration programme, a reparations programme, a memory project and symbolic measures. Procedurally, the paper argues for local leadership supported by external engagement designed to ensure that basic global standards are met. Substantively, it explores tensions within transitional justice and across the wider reform process when such an agenda is pursued. To close, it holds that, while transitional justice may take years to gain a secure foothold in Myanmar, robust foundations should be laid now.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherIP Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ippublishing.com/general_asia.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSouth East Asia Researchen_US
dc.titleThinking about Transitional Justice in Myanmaren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHolliday, IM: hollid@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHolliday, IM=rp00067en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.5367/sear.2014.0204-
dc.identifier.hkuros238412en_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.spage183en_US
dc.identifier.epage200en_US
dc.publisher.placeLondonen_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats