File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Viral lung infections: epidemiology, virology, clinical features, and management of avian influenza A(H7N9)

TitleViral lung infections: epidemiology, virology, clinical features, and management of avian influenza A(H7N9)
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.co-pulmonarymedicine.com
Citation
Current opinion in pulmonary medicine, 2014, v. 20 n. 3, p. 225-232 How to Cite?
AbstractPURPOSE OF REVIEW: The avian influenza A(H7N9) virus has jumped species barrier and caused severe human infections. Here, we present the virological features relevant to clinical practice, and summarize the epidemiology, clinical findings, diagnosis, treatment, and preventive strategies of A(H7N9) infection. RECENT FINDINGS: As of 18 February 2014, A(H7N9) virus has caused 354 infections in mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong with a case-fatality rate of 32%. Elderly men were most affected. Most patients acquired the infection from direct contact with poultry or from a contaminated environment, although person-to-person transmission has likely occurred. A(H7N9) infection has usually presented with severe pneumonia, often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure. Mild infections have been reported in children and young adults. Nasopharyngeal aspirate and sputum samples should be collected for diagnosis, preferably using reverse transcriptase-PCR. Early treatment with neuraminidase inhibitors improved survival, but the efficacy of antivirals was hampered by resistant mutants. The closure of live poultry markets in affected areas has significantly contributed to the decline in the incidence of human cases. SUMMARY: The emergence of A(H7N9) virus represents a significant health threat. High vigilance is necessary so that appropriate treatment can be instituted for the patient and preventive measures can be implemented. © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203174
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.079
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.397
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTo, KKW-
dc.contributor.authorChan, JFW-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY-
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T12:56:45Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T12:56:45Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationCurrent opinion in pulmonary medicine, 2014, v. 20 n. 3, p. 225-232-
dc.identifier.issn1070-5287-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203174-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE OF REVIEW: The avian influenza A(H7N9) virus has jumped species barrier and caused severe human infections. Here, we present the virological features relevant to clinical practice, and summarize the epidemiology, clinical findings, diagnosis, treatment, and preventive strategies of A(H7N9) infection. RECENT FINDINGS: As of 18 February 2014, A(H7N9) virus has caused 354 infections in mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong with a case-fatality rate of 32%. Elderly men were most affected. Most patients acquired the infection from direct contact with poultry or from a contaminated environment, although person-to-person transmission has likely occurred. A(H7N9) infection has usually presented with severe pneumonia, often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure. Mild infections have been reported in children and young adults. Nasopharyngeal aspirate and sputum samples should be collected for diagnosis, preferably using reverse transcriptase-PCR. Early treatment with neuraminidase inhibitors improved survival, but the efficacy of antivirals was hampered by resistant mutants. The closure of live poultry markets in affected areas has significantly contributed to the decline in the incidence of human cases. SUMMARY: The emergence of A(H7N9) virus represents a significant health threat. High vigilance is necessary so that appropriate treatment can be instituted for the patient and preventive measures can be implemented. © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.co-pulmonarymedicine.com-
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent opinion in pulmonary medicine-
dc.rightsThis is a non-final version of an article published in final form in (provide complete journal citation)-
dc.titleViral lung infections: epidemiology, virology, clinical features, and management of avian influenza A(H7N9)-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTo, KKW: kelvinto@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, JFW: jfwchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY: kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTo, KKW=rp01384-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, JFW=rp01736-
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/MCP.0000000000000047-
dc.identifier.pmid24637225-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84897580893-
dc.identifier.hkuros238421-
dc.identifier.volume20-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage225-
dc.identifier.epage232-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000333635300003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats