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Article: Obstructive sleep apnoea, insulin resistance and adipocytokines

TitleObstructive sleep apnoea, insulin resistance and adipocytokines
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherWiley. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664
Citation
Clinical Endocrinology, 2015, v. 82 n. 2, p. 165-177 How to Cite?
AbstractObstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is associated with multiple cardiometabolic abnormalities. Obesity is considered a major risk factor for the development of OSA and it is also an established risk factor for insulin resistance and other cardiometabolic disorders. The enigma remains whether OSA has any causal role in the adverse metabolic profile, independent of or beyond that due to obesity. Sleep apnoeas and hypopnoeas result directly in intermittent hypoxaemia and cerebral arousals, both of which may evoke a cascade of downstream biologic responses in various body tissues and cells. Adipose tissue is a major source of adipocytokines many of which play important roles in the regulation of various metabolic functions. It is hypothesized that OSA may, through its unique pathophysiology, affect metabolic function through modulation of production or action of adipocytokines. This review focuses on insulin resistance, glucose metabolism and relevant adipocytokines in the context of OSA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203105

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, CLDen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_US
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T11:30:42Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-19T11:30:42Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Endocrinology, 2015, v. 82 n. 2, p. 165-177en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/203105-
dc.description.abstractObstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is associated with multiple cardiometabolic abnormalities. Obesity is considered a major risk factor for the development of OSA and it is also an established risk factor for insulin resistance and other cardiometabolic disorders. The enigma remains whether OSA has any causal role in the adverse metabolic profile, independent of or beyond that due to obesity. Sleep apnoeas and hypopnoeas result directly in intermittent hypoxaemia and cerebral arousals, both of which may evoke a cascade of downstream biologic responses in various body tissues and cells. Adipose tissue is a major source of adipocytokines many of which play important roles in the regulation of various metabolic functions. It is hypothesized that OSA may, through its unique pathophysiology, affect metabolic function through modulation of production or action of adipocytokines. This review focuses on insulin resistance, glucose metabolism and relevant adipocytokines in the context of OSA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664en_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Endocrinologyen_US
dc.titleObstructive sleep apnoea, insulin resistance and adipocytokinesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, CLD: dcllam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL: ksllam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailIp, MSM: msmip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CLD=rp01345en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_US
dc.identifier.authorityIp, MSM=rp00347en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cen.12597en_US
dc.identifier.pmid25154902-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84921514785-
dc.identifier.hkuros237761en_US

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