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Book Chapter: Wielding the sword: President Xi’s new anti-corruption campaign

TitleWielding the sword: President Xi’s new anti-corruption campaign
Authors
KeywordsEconomics and finance
Economic crime and corruption
Law - academic
Corruption and economic crime
Politics and public policy
Public policy
Issue Date2015
PublisherEdward Elgar
Citation
Wielding the sword: President Xi’s new anti-corruption campaign. In Rose-Ackerman, S & Lagunes, P (Eds.), Greed, Corruption, and the Modern State: Essays in Political Economy, p. 134-158. Cheltenham, UK ; Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar, 2015 How to Cite?
AbstractA state achieves legitimacy through multiple sources, one of which is the effectiveness of its governance. Generations of scholars since Hobbes have identified the maintenance of peace and order as core functions of a legitimate state. In the modern world, economic prosperity, social stability and effective control of corruption often provide adequate compensation for a deficit of democracy. Corruption closely correlates with legitimacy. While a perceived pervasive, endemic corruption undermines the legitimacy of a regime, a successful anti-corruption campaign can allow a regime to recover from a crisis of legitimacy (Gilley 2009; Seligson and Booth 2009). This is the rationale behind the periodical campaigns against corruption that have been conducted by the Chinese Communist Party (‘Party’ or ‘CCP’) (Manion 2004; Wedeman 2012). Political leaders in China have found it expedient to use anti-corruption campaigns to remove their political foes, to rein in the bureaucracy and to restore public confidence in their ability to rule. Through anti-corruption campaigns, emerging political leaders consolidate their political power, secure loyalty from political factions and regional political forces, and enhance their legitimacy in the eyes of the general public. In an authoritarian state that experiences a high level of corruption, an anti-corruption campaign is a delicate political battle that addresses two significant concerns. The first concern is to orchestrate the campaign so that it is regime-reinforcing instead of regime-undermining. To remain credible, the regime must demonstrate its willingness and capacity to punish corrupt officials at the highest levels.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202315
ISBN
SSRN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFu, H-
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-15T01:50:38Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-15T01:50:38Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationWielding the sword: President Xi’s new anti-corruption campaign. In Rose-Ackerman, S & Lagunes, P (Eds.), Greed, Corruption, and the Modern State: Essays in Political Economy, p. 134-158. Cheltenham, UK ; Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar, 2015-
dc.identifier.isbn9781784714697-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202315-
dc.description.abstractA state achieves legitimacy through multiple sources, one of which is the effectiveness of its governance. Generations of scholars since Hobbes have identified the maintenance of peace and order as core functions of a legitimate state. In the modern world, economic prosperity, social stability and effective control of corruption often provide adequate compensation for a deficit of democracy. Corruption closely correlates with legitimacy. While a perceived pervasive, endemic corruption undermines the legitimacy of a regime, a successful anti-corruption campaign can allow a regime to recover from a crisis of legitimacy (Gilley 2009; Seligson and Booth 2009). This is the rationale behind the periodical campaigns against corruption that have been conducted by the Chinese Communist Party (‘Party’ or ‘CCP’) (Manion 2004; Wedeman 2012). Political leaders in China have found it expedient to use anti-corruption campaigns to remove their political foes, to rein in the bureaucracy and to restore public confidence in their ability to rule. Through anti-corruption campaigns, emerging political leaders consolidate their political power, secure loyalty from political factions and regional political forces, and enhance their legitimacy in the eyes of the general public. In an authoritarian state that experiences a high level of corruption, an anti-corruption campaign is a delicate political battle that addresses two significant concerns. The first concern is to orchestrate the campaign so that it is regime-reinforcing instead of regime-undermining. To remain credible, the regime must demonstrate its willingness and capacity to punish corrupt officials at the highest levels.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherEdward Elgar-
dc.relation.ispartofGreed, Corruption, and the Modern State: Essays in Political Economy-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectEconomics and finance-
dc.subjectEconomic crime and corruption-
dc.subjectLaw - academic-
dc.subjectCorruption and economic crime-
dc.subjectPolitics and public policy-
dc.subjectPublic policy-
dc.titleWielding the sword: President Xi’s new anti-corruption campaignen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailFu, H: hlfu@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepreprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.4337/9781784714703.00011-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84958906960-
dc.identifier.hkuros270291-
dc.identifier.spage134-
dc.identifier.epage158-
dc.publisher.placeCheltenham, UK ; Northampton, MA-
dc.identifier.ssrn2492407-
dc.identifier.hkulrp2014/030-

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