File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Students' perceptions of school climate in the U.S. and China

TitleStudents' perceptions of school climate in the U.S. and China
Authors
KeywordsSchool climate
Measurement invariance
Classroom management
Cross-cultural
Delaware School Climate Survey
Issue Date2013
Citation
School Psychology Quarterly, 2013, v. 28, n. 1, p. 7-24 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough the construct of student climate has been studied extensively in the United States, we know little about how school climate is perceived in other countries. With large class sizes yet higher academic achievement and less disruptive and aggressive student behaviors, schools in China present a contrast to many schools in the United States. Differences in school climate between the two countries were examined in this study. The sample consisted of 10,400 American and 3,435 Chinese students across three grade levels (elementary, middle, and high school) in 85 American and 22 Chinese schools. Factor structure and measurement invariance across countries were first established for the Modified-Delaware School Climate Survey-Student. Differences in latent means were then tested. Across all three grade levels Chinese students scored significantly higher than American students on all four subscales (Teacher-Student Relations, Student-Student Relations, School Liking, and Fairness of School Rules). Effects sizes tended to be smallest in elementary schools and largest in middle schools. Significant differences between American and Chinese students exist in their perceptions of school climate. It is likely that those differences can be attributed to cultural differences in respect of authority, academic and social values, self-regulation and peer-regulation of behaviors, and teachers' classroom management. © 2013 American Psychological Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202186
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.75
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.824
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, Chunyan-
dc.contributor.authorBear, George G.-
dc.contributor.authorChen, Fangfang-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Wei-
dc.contributor.authorBlank, Jessica C.-
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Xishan-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-22T02:57:46Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-22T02:57:46Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationSchool Psychology Quarterly, 2013, v. 28, n. 1, p. 7-24-
dc.identifier.issn1045-3830-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202186-
dc.description.abstractAlthough the construct of student climate has been studied extensively in the United States, we know little about how school climate is perceived in other countries. With large class sizes yet higher academic achievement and less disruptive and aggressive student behaviors, schools in China present a contrast to many schools in the United States. Differences in school climate between the two countries were examined in this study. The sample consisted of 10,400 American and 3,435 Chinese students across three grade levels (elementary, middle, and high school) in 85 American and 22 Chinese schools. Factor structure and measurement invariance across countries were first established for the Modified-Delaware School Climate Survey-Student. Differences in latent means were then tested. Across all three grade levels Chinese students scored significantly higher than American students on all four subscales (Teacher-Student Relations, Student-Student Relations, School Liking, and Fairness of School Rules). Effects sizes tended to be smallest in elementary schools and largest in middle schools. Significant differences between American and Chinese students exist in their perceptions of school climate. It is likely that those differences can be attributed to cultural differences in respect of authority, academic and social values, self-regulation and peer-regulation of behaviors, and teachers' classroom management. © 2013 American Psychological Association.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofSchool Psychology Quarterly-
dc.subjectSchool climate-
dc.subjectMeasurement invariance-
dc.subjectClassroom management-
dc.subjectCross-cultural-
dc.subjectDelaware School Climate Survey-
dc.titleStudents' perceptions of school climate in the U.S. and China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/spq0000002-
dc.identifier.pmid23506022-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84875322212-
dc.identifier.volume28-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage7-
dc.identifier.epage24-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000316165200002-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats