File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Two Concepts or Two Approaches? A Bifactor Analysis of Psychological and Subjective Well-Being

TitleTwo Concepts or Two Approaches? A Bifactor Analysis of Psychological and Subjective Well-Being
Authors
KeywordsPositive and negative affect
Psychological well-being
Second-order factor model
Subjective well-being
Life satisfaction
Personality
Bifactor model
Issue Date2013
Citation
Journal of Happiness Studies, 2013, v. 14, n. 3, p. 1033-1068 How to Cite?
AbstractResearchers often debate about whether there is a meaningful differentiation between psychological well-being and subjective well-being. One view argues that psychological and subjective well-being are distinct dimensions, whereas another view proposes that they are different perspectives on the same general construct and thus are more similar than different. The purpose of this investigation was to examine these two competing views by using a statistical approach, the bifactor model, that allows for an examination of the common variance shared by the two types of well-being and the unique variance specific to each. In one college sample and one nationally representative sample, the bifactor model revealed a strong general factor, which captures the common ground shared by the measures of psychological well-being and subjective well-being. The bifactor model also revealed four specific factors of psychological well-being and three specific factors of subjective well-being, after partialling out the general well-being factor. We further examined the relations of the specific factors of psychological and subjective well-being to external measures. The specific factors demonstrated incremental predictive power, independent of the general well-being factor. These results suggest that psychological well-being and subjective well-being are strongly related at the general construct level, but their individual components are distinct once their overlap with the general construct of well-being is partialled out. The findings thus indicate that both perspectives have merit, depending on the level of analysis. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202164
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.846
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.881
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, Fangfang-
dc.contributor.authorJing, Yiming-
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Adele M.-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Jeongmin-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-22T02:57:45Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-22T02:57:45Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Happiness Studies, 2013, v. 14, n. 3, p. 1033-1068-
dc.identifier.issn1389-4978-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202164-
dc.description.abstractResearchers often debate about whether there is a meaningful differentiation between psychological well-being and subjective well-being. One view argues that psychological and subjective well-being are distinct dimensions, whereas another view proposes that they are different perspectives on the same general construct and thus are more similar than different. The purpose of this investigation was to examine these two competing views by using a statistical approach, the bifactor model, that allows for an examination of the common variance shared by the two types of well-being and the unique variance specific to each. In one college sample and one nationally representative sample, the bifactor model revealed a strong general factor, which captures the common ground shared by the measures of psychological well-being and subjective well-being. The bifactor model also revealed four specific factors of psychological well-being and three specific factors of subjective well-being, after partialling out the general well-being factor. We further examined the relations of the specific factors of psychological and subjective well-being to external measures. The specific factors demonstrated incremental predictive power, independent of the general well-being factor. These results suggest that psychological well-being and subjective well-being are strongly related at the general construct level, but their individual components are distinct once their overlap with the general construct of well-being is partialled out. The findings thus indicate that both perspectives have merit, depending on the level of analysis. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Happiness Studies-
dc.subjectPositive and negative affect-
dc.subjectPsychological well-being-
dc.subjectSecond-order factor model-
dc.subjectSubjective well-being-
dc.subjectLife satisfaction-
dc.subjectPersonality-
dc.subjectBifactor model-
dc.titleTwo Concepts or Two Approaches? A Bifactor Analysis of Psychological and Subjective Well-Being-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10902-012-9367-x-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84879195559-
dc.identifier.volume14-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage1033-
dc.identifier.epage1068-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000320776200017-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats