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Conference Paper: Architecture and Urban Living in Early 20th Century South China

TitleArchitecture and Urban Living in Early 20th Century South China
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherUniversity of California Press.
Citation
The 68th Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH), Chicago, IL., 15-19 April 2015. In Society of Architectural Historians 68th Annual Conference, Chicago, April 15-19, 2015, p. 13 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper explores the ways in which architecture and urban living have been articulated in the popular press in Hong Kong and Canton in the mid 1930s – a period that saw both cities underwent accelerating real estate speculation and the emergence of new types of residential spaces and urban amenities. While much have been written on “modern” Asian metropolises such as Shanghai and Tokyo, less attention has been paid to developments in other urban centers and their roles in the ongoing construction of cultural knowledge that traversed across the region. This paper will examine reports of new building and infrastructural projects in Hong Kong and Canton that appeared in trade journals and how these writings converged with and diverged from other narratives of urban living by writers of different social positions. It argues that although modernizing projects were initiated by professional experts, the shift toward a new urban milieu was facilitated by a host of moralizing practices that took place across multiple sites and scales. An examination of the articles circulating in the Chinese press in the period, for example, reveals not only a widespread obsession with different facets of modern living ranging from the improvement of hygiene to the design of domestic furnishings, but also a conscious effort to construct a regional, modern “Cantonese” identity set in contrast to the “backward” Chinese Mainland. Meanwhile, the proliferating discussion of modernization also prompted new demand for better housing and right to urban services among the less wealthy. By attending to the connection between building forms and social norms in this period, I seek to illustrate the formation of “epistemic communities” amidst ongoing capitalist urban development and the dialogic processes through which an increasing number of Chinese participated in a new mode of self-governance and construction of an emergent moral topography.
DescriptionPS7
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202084

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChu, CL-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T08:02:59Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T08:02:59Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe 68th Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH), Chicago, IL., 15-19 April 2015. In Society of Architectural Historians 68th Annual Conference, Chicago, April 15-19, 2015, p. 13-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202084-
dc.descriptionPS7-
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the ways in which architecture and urban living have been articulated in the popular press in Hong Kong and Canton in the mid 1930s – a period that saw both cities underwent accelerating real estate speculation and the emergence of new types of residential spaces and urban amenities. While much have been written on “modern” Asian metropolises such as Shanghai and Tokyo, less attention has been paid to developments in other urban centers and their roles in the ongoing construction of cultural knowledge that traversed across the region. This paper will examine reports of new building and infrastructural projects in Hong Kong and Canton that appeared in trade journals and how these writings converged with and diverged from other narratives of urban living by writers of different social positions. It argues that although modernizing projects were initiated by professional experts, the shift toward a new urban milieu was facilitated by a host of moralizing practices that took place across multiple sites and scales. An examination of the articles circulating in the Chinese press in the period, for example, reveals not only a widespread obsession with different facets of modern living ranging from the improvement of hygiene to the design of domestic furnishings, but also a conscious effort to construct a regional, modern “Cantonese” identity set in contrast to the “backward” Chinese Mainland. Meanwhile, the proliferating discussion of modernization also prompted new demand for better housing and right to urban services among the less wealthy. By attending to the connection between building forms and social norms in this period, I seek to illustrate the formation of “epistemic communities” amidst ongoing capitalist urban development and the dialogic processes through which an increasing number of Chinese participated in a new mode of self-governance and construction of an emergent moral topography.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherUniversity of California Press.-
dc.relation.ispartofSociety of Architectural Historians 68th Annual Conference, Chicago, April 15-19, 2015-
dc.rightsSociety of Architectural Historians 68th Annual Conference, Chicago, April 15-19, 2015. Copyright © University of California Press.-
dc.rightsPublished as [provide complete bibliographic citation, as appears in the print version of your journal]. © [Year] by [the Regents of the University of California/Sponsoring Society or Association]. Copying and permissions notice: Authorization to copy this content beyond fair use (as specified in Sections 107 and 108 of the U. S. Copyright Law) for internal or personal use, or the internal or personal use of specific clients, is granted by [the Regents of the University of California/on behalf of the Sponsoring Society] for libraries and other users, provided that they are registered with and pay the specified fee via Rightslink® on [Caliber (http://caliber.ucpress.net/)] or directly with the Copyright Clearance Center, http://www.copyright.com-
dc.titleArchitecture and Urban Living in Early 20th Century South China-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailChu, CL: clchu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChu, CL=rp01708-
dc.identifier.hkuros233462-
dc.identifier.spage13-
dc.identifier.epage13-
dc.publisher.placeBerkeley, Calif.-
dc.customcontrol.immutableyiu 150528-

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