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Book Chapter: Categorization and features: Evidence from American English /ɹ/

TitleCategorization and features: Evidence from American English /ɹ/
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherJohn Benjamins
Citation
Categorization and features: Evidence from American English /ɹ/. In Clements, GN & Ridouane, R (Eds.), Where Do Phonological Features Come From?: Cognitive, physical and developmental bases of distinctive speech categories, p. 173-196. Amsterdam; Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 2011 How to Cite?
AbstractPhonological features allow for formal expression of sound patterns used by speakers of a language. To understand where features come from, it is worth exploring where the patterns themselves come from. In this paper, we argue that the retroflex (tongue tip up) or bunched (tongue tip down) articulation of American English /ɹ/ is speaker- and context-dependent. We provide arguments against two overt sources for these patterns, phonological patterns and perception, as well as against their being purely the result of physiology. The conclusion we come to is that these patterns are spontaneously created by the speakers in order to provide order to their articulations of the sound /ɹ/. We conjecture that if patterns arise spontaneously, so too might features.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202017
ISBN
Series/Report no.Language faculty and beyond; v. 6

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorArchangeli, DBen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaker, TAen_US
dc.contributor.authorMielke, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:57:39Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:57:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationCategorization and features: Evidence from American English /ɹ/. In Clements, GN & Ridouane, R (Eds.), Where Do Phonological Features Come From?: Cognitive, physical and developmental bases of distinctive speech categories, p. 173-196. Amsterdam; Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 2011en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9789027208231-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/202017-
dc.description.abstractPhonological features allow for formal expression of sound patterns used by speakers of a language. To understand where features come from, it is worth exploring where the patterns themselves come from. In this paper, we argue that the retroflex (tongue tip up) or bunched (tongue tip down) articulation of American English /ɹ/ is speaker- and context-dependent. We provide arguments against two overt sources for these patterns, phonological patterns and perception, as well as against their being purely the result of physiology. The conclusion we come to is that these patterns are spontaneously created by the speakers in order to provide order to their articulations of the sound /ɹ/. We conjecture that if patterns arise spontaneously, so too might features.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Benjaminsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofWhere Do Phonological Features Come From?: Cognitive, physical and developmental bases of distinctive speech categoriesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLanguage faculty and beyond; v. 6-
dc.titleCategorization and features: Evidence from American English /ɹ/en_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailArchangeli, DB: darchang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityArchangeli, DB=rp01748en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1075/lfab.6.07arc-
dc.identifier.hkuros232162en_US
dc.identifier.spage173en_US
dc.identifier.epage196en_US
dc.publisher.placeAmsterdam; Philadelphia-

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