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Conference Paper: A Qualitative Investigation on Elder Abuse Survivors

TitleA Qualitative Investigation on Elder Abuse Survivors
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://gerontologist.gerontologyjournals.org
Citation
The 66th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America (GSA 2013), New Orleans, LA., 20-24 November 2013. In the Gerontologist, 2013, v. 53 suppl. 1, p. 437 How to Cite?
AbstractA total of 40 elder abuse survivors recruited from shelters shared their experience of abuse and help seeking in in-depth interviews. Participants reported diverse types of abuse including psychological and social abuse, physical abuse, violation of persona rights, financial exploitations, etc. Majority of the participants reported a long-standing violent relationship in their families. Many have tolerated an abusive spousal relationship for decades. Intergenerational transmission of violence was evident. Many reported having been victims of spousal abuse earlier in their lives, and later fall victims of abuse by their children and children-in-laws. Cultural beliefs, including perceptions that “one shouldn’t hang dirty laundry in public”, “blood is thicker than water”, “it is fate” are salient themes that emerged in the interviews. Participant reported a sense of entrapment in the abusive situations. Many recalled that they tolerated the abuse as they did not know where and from whom to seek help. Majority of the participants did not seek help proactively, instead, they were identified by their friends or neighbors as abuse victims before being referred to the shelter. When asked of whether their experience constitute abuse, most indicated they did not consider their experience abuse, and many reported that “they would not meddle with others’ business” even if they know someone falling victims of elder abuse.
DescriptionConferenc theme: Optimal Aging Through Research
Session 1545 (Paper): Adult Protection and Elder Abuse
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201774
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.168
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.584

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYan, ECWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:40:23Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:40:23Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 66th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America (GSA 2013), New Orleans, LA., 20-24 November 2013. In the Gerontologist, 2013, v. 53 suppl. 1, p. 437en_US
dc.identifier.issn0016-9013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201774-
dc.descriptionConferenc theme: Optimal Aging Through Research-
dc.descriptionSession 1545 (Paper): Adult Protection and Elder Abuse-
dc.description.abstractA total of 40 elder abuse survivors recruited from shelters shared their experience of abuse and help seeking in in-depth interviews. Participants reported diverse types of abuse including psychological and social abuse, physical abuse, violation of persona rights, financial exploitations, etc. Majority of the participants reported a long-standing violent relationship in their families. Many have tolerated an abusive spousal relationship for decades. Intergenerational transmission of violence was evident. Many reported having been victims of spousal abuse earlier in their lives, and later fall victims of abuse by their children and children-in-laws. Cultural beliefs, including perceptions that “one shouldn’t hang dirty laundry in public”, “blood is thicker than water”, “it is fate” are salient themes that emerged in the interviews. Participant reported a sense of entrapment in the abusive situations. Many recalled that they tolerated the abuse as they did not know where and from whom to seek help. Majority of the participants did not seek help proactively, instead, they were identified by their friends or neighbors as abuse victims before being referred to the shelter. When asked of whether their experience constitute abuse, most indicated they did not consider their experience abuse, and many reported that “they would not meddle with others’ business” even if they know someone falling victims of elder abuse.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://gerontologist.gerontologyjournals.org-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Gerontologisten_US
dc.titleA Qualitative Investigation on Elder Abuse Survivorsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailYan, ECW: elsieyan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYan, ECW=rp00600en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/geront/gnt151-
dc.identifier.hkuros234482en_US
dc.identifier.volume53-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spage437-
dc.identifier.epage437-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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