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Book Chapter: Comparing Pedagogical Innovations

TitleComparing Pedagogical Innovations
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherComparative Education Research Centre, The University of Hong Kong; Springer
Citation
Comparing Pedagogical Innovations. In Bray, M; Adamson, B & Mason, M (Eds.), Comparative Education Research: Approaches and Methods (2nd ed.), p. 333-364. Hong Kong: Comparative Education Research Centre, The University of Hong Kong; Springer, 2014 How to Cite?
AbstractInnovation seems to be a constant – and necessary – theme in education. A common underlying rationale is that changes in education of all levels and types prepare citizens for life in the knowledge society. The contexts include intensifying globalisation, progressively shorter half-lives of knowledge, and economic competitiveness which requires increased collaboration and different ways of working (Hershock et al. 2007; Scardamalia & Bereiter 2010). As the creation and dissemination of knowledge are perceived to be of paramount importance, education requires new goals and processes. This view is applicable both in economically advanced countries (e.g. European Round Table of Industrialists 1997; OECD 2004) and in less developed countries (e.g. UNESCO 2003; Kozma 2008).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201575
ISBN
Series/Report no.CERC studies in comparative education; 32

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaw, NWY-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:30:52Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:30:52Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationComparing Pedagogical Innovations. In Bray, M; Adamson, B & Mason, M (Eds.), Comparative Education Research: Approaches and Methods (2nd ed.), p. 333-364. Hong Kong: Comparative Education Research Centre, The University of Hong Kong; Springer, 2014-
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-319-05593-0-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/201575-
dc.description.abstractInnovation seems to be a constant – and necessary – theme in education. A common underlying rationale is that changes in education of all levels and types prepare citizens for life in the knowledge society. The contexts include intensifying globalisation, progressively shorter half-lives of knowledge, and economic competitiveness which requires increased collaboration and different ways of working (Hershock et al. 2007; Scardamalia & Bereiter 2010). As the creation and dissemination of knowledge are perceived to be of paramount importance, education requires new goals and processes. This view is applicable both in economically advanced countries (e.g. European Round Table of Industrialists 1997; OECD 2004) and in less developed countries (e.g. UNESCO 2003; Kozma 2008).-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherComparative Education Research Centre, The University of Hong Kong; Springer-
dc.relation.ispartofComparative Education Research: Approaches and Methods (2nd ed.)-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCERC studies in comparative education; 32-
dc.titleComparing Pedagogical Innovations-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailLaw, NWY: nlaw@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, NWY=rp00919-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-05594-7_12-
dc.identifier.hkuros233948-
dc.identifier.hkuros254246-
dc.identifier.spage333-
dc.identifier.epage364-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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