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Article: Cues For Lexical Tone Perception In Children: Acoustic Correlates And Phonetic Context Effects

TitleCues For Lexical Tone Perception In Children: Acoustic Correlates And Phonetic Context Effects
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 2014, v. 57 n. 5, p. 1589-1605 How to Cite?
AbstractPURPOSE This study investigated the effects of acoustic cues (i.e., pitch height, pitch contour, and pitch onset and offset) and phonetic context cues (i.e., syllable onsets and rimes) on lexical tone perception in Cantonese-speaking children. METHOD Eight minimum pairs of tonal contrasts were presented in either an identical phonetic context or in different phonetic contexts (different syllable onsets and rimes). Children were instructed to engage in tone identification and tone discrimination. RESULTS Cantonese children attended to pitch onset in perceiving similarly-contoured tones while they attended to pitch contour in perceiving different-contoured tones. There was a decreasing level of tone discrimination accuracy, with tone perception being easiest for same rime-different syllable onset, more difficult for different rime-same syllable onset, and most difficult for different rime-different syllable onset phonetic contexts. This pattern was observed in tonal contrasts in which the member tones had the same contour, but not in ones in which the member tones had different contours. CONCLUSION These findings suggest that in addition to pitch contour, the pitch onset is another important acoustic cue for tone perception. The relative importance of acoustic cues for tone perception is phonetically context-dependent. These findings are discussed with reference to a newly modified TRACE model for tone languages (TTRACE).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200896

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTong, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcBride, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurnham, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:06:42Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:06:42Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 2014, v. 57 n. 5, p. 1589-1605en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200896-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE This study investigated the effects of acoustic cues (i.e., pitch height, pitch contour, and pitch onset and offset) and phonetic context cues (i.e., syllable onsets and rimes) on lexical tone perception in Cantonese-speaking children. METHOD Eight minimum pairs of tonal contrasts were presented in either an identical phonetic context or in different phonetic contexts (different syllable onsets and rimes). Children were instructed to engage in tone identification and tone discrimination. RESULTS Cantonese children attended to pitch onset in perceiving similarly-contoured tones while they attended to pitch contour in perceiving different-contoured tones. There was a decreasing level of tone discrimination accuracy, with tone perception being easiest for same rime-different syllable onset, more difficult for different rime-same syllable onset, and most difficult for different rime-different syllable onset phonetic contexts. This pattern was observed in tonal contrasts in which the member tones had the same contour, but not in ones in which the member tones had different contours. CONCLUSION These findings suggest that in addition to pitch contour, the pitch onset is another important acoustic cue for tone perception. The relative importance of acoustic cues for tone perception is phonetically context-dependent. These findings are discussed with reference to a newly modified TRACE model for tone languages (TTRACE).en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research.en_US
dc.titleCues For Lexical Tone Perception In Children: Acoustic Correlates And Phonetic Context Effectsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTong, X: xltong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTong, X=rp01546en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1044/2014_JSLHR-S-13-0145en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros233138en_US

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