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Article: Children with Disability Are More at Risk of Violence Victimization: Evidence from a Study of School-Aged Chinese Children

TitleChildren with Disability Are More at Risk of Violence Victimization: Evidence from a Study of School-Aged Chinese Children
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=108
Citation
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 2016, v. 31 n. 6, p. 1026–1046 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough research tends to focus on whether children with disability are more at risk of violence victimization, conclusive evidence on the association, especially in non-Western settings, is lacking. Using a large and representative sample of school-aged children in Hong Kong (N = 5,841, aged 9-18 years), this study aims to fill the research gap by providing reliable estimates of the prevalence of disability and the direct and indirect experiences of violence among children with disability. The study also compares the prevalence of child maltreatment, parental intimate partner violence (IPV), and in-law conflict to explore the factors related to the association between disability and violence victimization. The prevalence of disability among children was about 6%. Children with disability were more likely to report victimization than those without disability: 32% to 60% of the former had experienced child maltreatment, and 12% to 46% of them had witnessed IPV between parents or in-law conflict. The results of a logistic regression showed that disability increased the risk of lifetime physical maltreatment by 1.6 times. Furthermore, low levels of parental education and paternal unemployment were risk factors for lifetime child maltreatment. The risk of child maltreatment could have an almost sixfold increase when the child had also witnessed other types of family violence. Possible explanations and implications of the findings are discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200773
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.579
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.064

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, EKL-
dc.contributor.authorEmery, CR-
dc.contributor.authorIp, P-
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-21T07:00:31Z-
dc.date.available2014-08-21T07:00:31Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Interpersonal Violence, 2016, v. 31 n. 6, p. 1026–1046-
dc.identifier.issn0886-2605-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200773-
dc.description.abstractAlthough research tends to focus on whether children with disability are more at risk of violence victimization, conclusive evidence on the association, especially in non-Western settings, is lacking. Using a large and representative sample of school-aged children in Hong Kong (N = 5,841, aged 9-18 years), this study aims to fill the research gap by providing reliable estimates of the prevalence of disability and the direct and indirect experiences of violence among children with disability. The study also compares the prevalence of child maltreatment, parental intimate partner violence (IPV), and in-law conflict to explore the factors related to the association between disability and violence victimization. The prevalence of disability among children was about 6%. Children with disability were more likely to report victimization than those without disability: 32% to 60% of the former had experienced child maltreatment, and 12% to 46% of them had witnessed IPV between parents or in-law conflict. The results of a logistic regression showed that disability increased the risk of lifetime physical maltreatment by 1.6 times. Furthermore, low levels of parental education and paternal unemployment were risk factors for lifetime child maltreatment. The risk of child maltreatment could have an almost sixfold increase when the child had also witnessed other types of family violence. Possible explanations and implications of the findings are discussed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=108-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Interpersonal Violence-
dc.rightsJournal of Interpersonal Violence. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleChildren with Disability Are More at Risk of Violence Victimization: Evidence from a Study of School-Aged Chinese Children-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChan, EKL: eklchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailIp, P: patricip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, EKL=rp00572-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, P=rp01337-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0886260514564066-
dc.identifier.hkuros234373-
dc.identifier.hkuros249457-
dc.identifier.volume31-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage1026-
dc.identifier.epage1046-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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