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Article: Collaborative eye tracking: A potential training tool in laparoscopic surgery

TitleCollaborative eye tracking: A potential training tool in laparoscopic surgery
Authors
KeywordsSurgical
Computing
Eye-tracking
Human/Robotic
Training/courses
Issue Date2012
Citation
Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques, 2012, v. 26, n. 7, p. 2003-2009 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Eye-tracking technology has been shown to improve trainee performance in the aircraft industry, radiology, and surgery. The ability to track the point-of-regard of a supervisor and reflect this onto a subjects' laparoscopic screen to aid instruction of a simulated task is attractive, in particular when considering the multilingual make up of modern surgical teams and the development of collaborative surgical techniques. We tried to develop a bespoke interface to project a supervisors' point-of-regard onto a subjects' laparoscopic screen and to investigate whether using the supervisor's eye-gaze could be used as a tool to aid the identification of a target during a surgical-simulated task. Methods: We developed software to project a supervisors' point-of-regard onto a subjects' screen whilst undertaking surgically related laparoscopic tasks. Twenty-eight subjects with varying levels of operative experience and proficiency in English undertook a series of surgically minded laparoscopic tasks. Subjects were instructed with verbal queues (V), a cursor reflecting supervisor's eye-gaze (E), or both (VE). Performance metrics included time to complete tasks, eye-gaze latency, and number of errors. Results: Completion times and number of errors were significantly reduced when eye-gaze instruction was employed (VE, E). In addition, the time taken for the subject to correctly focus on the target (latency) was significantly reduced. Conclusions: We have successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of a novel framework to enable a supervisor eye-gaze to be projected onto a trainee's laparoscopic screen. Furthermore, we have shown that utilizing eyetracking technology to provide visual instruction improves completion times and reduces errors in a simulated environment. Although this technology requires significant development, the potential applications are wide-ranging. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200104
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.54
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.695
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChetwood, Andrew S A-
dc.contributor.authorKwok, Kawai-
dc.contributor.authorSun, Loiwah-
dc.contributor.authorMylonas, George P.-
dc.contributor.authorClark, James A.-
dc.contributor.authorDarzi, Ara W.-
dc.contributor.authorYang, Guangzhong-
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-26T23:11:08Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-26T23:11:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques, 2012, v. 26, n. 7, p. 2003-2009-
dc.identifier.issn0930-2794-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/200104-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Eye-tracking technology has been shown to improve trainee performance in the aircraft industry, radiology, and surgery. The ability to track the point-of-regard of a supervisor and reflect this onto a subjects' laparoscopic screen to aid instruction of a simulated task is attractive, in particular when considering the multilingual make up of modern surgical teams and the development of collaborative surgical techniques. We tried to develop a bespoke interface to project a supervisors' point-of-regard onto a subjects' laparoscopic screen and to investigate whether using the supervisor's eye-gaze could be used as a tool to aid the identification of a target during a surgical-simulated task. Methods: We developed software to project a supervisors' point-of-regard onto a subjects' screen whilst undertaking surgically related laparoscopic tasks. Twenty-eight subjects with varying levels of operative experience and proficiency in English undertook a series of surgically minded laparoscopic tasks. Subjects were instructed with verbal queues (V), a cursor reflecting supervisor's eye-gaze (E), or both (VE). Performance metrics included time to complete tasks, eye-gaze latency, and number of errors. Results: Completion times and number of errors were significantly reduced when eye-gaze instruction was employed (VE, E). In addition, the time taken for the subject to correctly focus on the target (latency) was significantly reduced. Conclusions: We have successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of a novel framework to enable a supervisor eye-gaze to be projected onto a trainee's laparoscopic screen. Furthermore, we have shown that utilizing eyetracking technology to provide visual instruction improves completion times and reduces errors in a simulated environment. Although this technology requires significant development, the potential applications are wide-ranging. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques-
dc.subjectSurgical-
dc.subjectComputing-
dc.subjectEye-tracking-
dc.subjectHuman/Robotic-
dc.subjectTraining/courses-
dc.titleCollaborative eye tracking: A potential training tool in laparoscopic surgery-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00464-011-2143-x-
dc.identifier.pmid22258302-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84864071448-
dc.identifier.volume26-
dc.identifier.issue7-
dc.identifier.spage2003-
dc.identifier.epage2009-
dc.identifier.eissn1432-2218-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000305214100029-

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