File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

postgraduate thesis: Industry decentralization in Hong Kong : some trends and patterns

TitleIndustry decentralization in Hong Kong : some trends and patterns
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Wu, J. N. [吴隽雨]. (2012). Industry decentralization in Hong Kong : some trends and patterns. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5217417
AbstractThe Hong Kong government has dedicated considerable resources to study and test the viability of office decentralization within the city since the 1980s, with objectives to achieve more sustainable industry spatial patterns and to relieve the Central Business District (CBD)from pressures created by high density of establishments and employment. Policies encouraging firm relocation from CBD areas to other office nodes have been implemented, and it was believed that the construction of new railway lines would facilitate such decentralization policies. In addition, a review of literature suggests that decentralization seems to be an inevitable trend in the evolution of a city. In particular, it was proposed by Smith & Selwood (1983) that decentralization could be industry-selective. With this background, this research aims to examine whether industries in Hong Kong have actually exhibited decentralizing spatial patterns from the period 1995 to 2010and to compare trend of changes in spatial patterns among different industries. Four industries were selected as the target of study, which are (1) finance and insurance, (2) professionals services, (3) real estate, and (4) import/export, wholesale and retail trades. Their employment and establishment data at Tertiary Planning Unit (TPU) level were obtained from the Census and Statistics Department and processed. Through the use of spatial tools, it was found that the real estate industry experienced most rapid trends of decentralization, both in establishment and employment. The other industries were less obviously decentralized; for the finance and insurance industry and the import/export, wholesale and retail industry, there even appeared indicators of stronger concentration in the study period. These findings provide strong support for future relocation policies to be industry-oriented. Another important finding is that for all industries in all study years, employment distribution tends to be more centralized than establishment distribution, which suggests that decentralizing people may be harder to achieve than decentralizing offices. It is thus envisaged that in the future, government policies regarding traffic management need to complement decentralization policies in order to alleviate transportation pressure in Hong Kong’s CBD area.
DegreeMaster of Arts in Transport Policy and Planning
SubjectIndustrial location - China - Hong Kong
Dept/ProgramTransport Policy and Planning
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199860

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, Juanyu, Nancy-
dc.contributor.author吴隽雨-
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-23T23:12:26Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-23T23:12:26Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationWu, J. N. [吴隽雨]. (2012). Industry decentralization in Hong Kong : some trends and patterns. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5217417-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199860-
dc.description.abstractThe Hong Kong government has dedicated considerable resources to study and test the viability of office decentralization within the city since the 1980s, with objectives to achieve more sustainable industry spatial patterns and to relieve the Central Business District (CBD)from pressures created by high density of establishments and employment. Policies encouraging firm relocation from CBD areas to other office nodes have been implemented, and it was believed that the construction of new railway lines would facilitate such decentralization policies. In addition, a review of literature suggests that decentralization seems to be an inevitable trend in the evolution of a city. In particular, it was proposed by Smith & Selwood (1983) that decentralization could be industry-selective. With this background, this research aims to examine whether industries in Hong Kong have actually exhibited decentralizing spatial patterns from the period 1995 to 2010and to compare trend of changes in spatial patterns among different industries. Four industries were selected as the target of study, which are (1) finance and insurance, (2) professionals services, (3) real estate, and (4) import/export, wholesale and retail trades. Their employment and establishment data at Tertiary Planning Unit (TPU) level were obtained from the Census and Statistics Department and processed. Through the use of spatial tools, it was found that the real estate industry experienced most rapid trends of decentralization, both in establishment and employment. The other industries were less obviously decentralized; for the finance and insurance industry and the import/export, wholesale and retail industry, there even appeared indicators of stronger concentration in the study period. These findings provide strong support for future relocation policies to be industry-oriented. Another important finding is that for all industries in all study years, employment distribution tends to be more centralized than establishment distribution, which suggests that decentralizing people may be harder to achieve than decentralizing offices. It is thus envisaged that in the future, government policies regarding traffic management need to complement decentralization policies in order to alleviate transportation pressure in Hong Kong’s CBD area.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshIndustrial location - China - Hong Kong-
dc.titleIndustry decentralization in Hong Kong : some trends and patterns-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5217417-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Arts in Transport Policy and Planning-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineTransport Policy and Planning-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5217417-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats