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Article: Hospitalization risk of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic cases in Hong Kong

TitleHospitalization risk of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic cases in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcinfectdis/
Citation
BMC Infectious Diseases, 2014, v. 14, article no. 32 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Reliable assessment for the severity of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza is critical for evaluation of vaccination strategies for future pandemics. This study aims to estimate the age-specific hospitalization risks of the 2009 pandemic cases during the first wave in Hong Kong, by combining the findings from the serology and disease burden studies. METHODS: Excess hospitalization rates associated with the pandemic H1N1 were estimated from Poisson regression models fitted to weekly total numbers of non-accidental hospitalization from 2005 to 2010. Age-specific infection-hospitalization risks were calculated as excess hospitalization rates divided by the attack rates in the corresponding age group, which were estimated from serology studies previously conducted in Hong Kong. RESULTS: Excess hospitalization rate associated with pandemic H1N1 was highest in the 0-4 age group (881.3 per 100,000 population), followed by the 5-14, 60+, 15-29, 50-59, 30-39 and 40-49 age groups. The hospitalization risk of the infected cases (i.e. infection-hospitalization risk) was found highest in the 60+ age group and lowest in the 15-29 age group, with the estimates of 17.5% and 0.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: People aged 60 or over had a relatively high infection-hospitalization risk during the first wave of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, despite of a low attack rate in this age group. The findings support the policy of listing older people as the priority group for pandemic vaccination.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199804
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.69
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.510
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, XLen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KPen_US
dc.contributor.authorCao, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T01:38:31Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-22T01:38:31Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationBMC Infectious Diseases, 2014, v. 14, article no. 32en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-2334-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199804-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Reliable assessment for the severity of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza is critical for evaluation of vaccination strategies for future pandemics. This study aims to estimate the age-specific hospitalization risks of the 2009 pandemic cases during the first wave in Hong Kong, by combining the findings from the serology and disease burden studies. METHODS: Excess hospitalization rates associated with the pandemic H1N1 were estimated from Poisson regression models fitted to weekly total numbers of non-accidental hospitalization from 2005 to 2010. Age-specific infection-hospitalization risks were calculated as excess hospitalization rates divided by the attack rates in the corresponding age group, which were estimated from serology studies previously conducted in Hong Kong. RESULTS: Excess hospitalization rate associated with pandemic H1N1 was highest in the 0-4 age group (881.3 per 100,000 population), followed by the 5-14, 60+, 15-29, 50-59, 30-39 and 40-49 age groups. The hospitalization risk of the infected cases (i.e. infection-hospitalization risk) was found highest in the 60+ age group and lowest in the 15-29 age group, with the estimates of 17.5% and 0.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: People aged 60 or over had a relatively high infection-hospitalization risk during the first wave of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, despite of a low attack rate in this age group. The findings support the policy of listing older people as the priority group for pandemic vaccination.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcinfectdis/-
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Infectious Diseasesen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleHospitalization risk of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic cases in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM: hrmrwcm@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, KH: chankh2@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, KP: kpchanaa@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYang, L: linyang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2334-14-32en_US
dc.identifier.pmid24428855-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3898487-
dc.identifier.hkuros230979en_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000330057900001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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