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Book Chapter: Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphins: A Demographic Perspective of a Threatened Species

TitleIndo-Pacific Humpback Dolphins: A Demographic Perspective of a Threatened Species
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphins: A Demographic Perspective of a Threatened Species. In Yamagiwa, J & Karczmarski, L (Eds.), Primates and Cetaceans: Field Research and Conservation of Complex Mammalian Societies, p. 249-272. Tokyo; New York : Springer, 2014 How to Cite?
AbstractIndo-Pacific humpback dolphins inhabit shallow coastal waters within the tropics and subtropics of the Indian and Western Pacific Oceans. Their taxonomy remains unresolved, between a single widespread and highly variable species, two species, and three species being currently proposed. Their inshore distribution renders them highly susceptible to the adverse effects of many human activities; for most of the known remaining populations their continuous survival is a subject of major conservation concern. In this chapter, we describe the use of demographic analysis to quantify population trend and, more informatively, predict the risk (probabilities) of extinction. The results of demographic analyses provide valuable means of assessing conservation status. Using the population of humpback dolphins from the Pearl River Estuary as an example, we show the power of demographic analyses, predicting a significant population decline before it is directly documented by other standard techniques. Comparing our findings with known, albeit limited data from southeast Africa, and considering the current ambiguity of the taxonomic classification adopted by IUCN, we question the current listing of humpback dolphins under the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. We urge that their conservation status classification be reconsidered as it likely understates, perhaps severely, the threats faced by many fragmented populations off Southeast Asia and the western Indian Ocean.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199771
ISBN
Series/Report no.Primatology monographs, 2190-5967

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorKarczmarski, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T01:35:48Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-22T01:35:48Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationIndo-Pacific Humpback Dolphins: A Demographic Perspective of a Threatened Species. In Yamagiwa, J & Karczmarski, L (Eds.), Primates and Cetaceans: Field Research and Conservation of Complex Mammalian Societies, p. 249-272. Tokyo; New York : Springer, 2014en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9784431545224-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199771-
dc.description.abstractIndo-Pacific humpback dolphins inhabit shallow coastal waters within the tropics and subtropics of the Indian and Western Pacific Oceans. Their taxonomy remains unresolved, between a single widespread and highly variable species, two species, and three species being currently proposed. Their inshore distribution renders them highly susceptible to the adverse effects of many human activities; for most of the known remaining populations their continuous survival is a subject of major conservation concern. In this chapter, we describe the use of demographic analysis to quantify population trend and, more informatively, predict the risk (probabilities) of extinction. The results of demographic analyses provide valuable means of assessing conservation status. Using the population of humpback dolphins from the Pearl River Estuary as an example, we show the power of demographic analyses, predicting a significant population decline before it is directly documented by other standard techniques. Comparing our findings with known, albeit limited data from southeast Africa, and considering the current ambiguity of the taxonomic classification adopted by IUCN, we question the current listing of humpback dolphins under the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. We urge that their conservation status classification be reconsidered as it likely understates, perhaps severely, the threats faced by many fragmented populations off Southeast Asia and the western Indian Ocean.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer-
dc.relation.ispartofPrimates and Cetaceans: Field Research and Conservation of Complex Mammalian Societiesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPrimatology monographs, 2190-5967-
dc.titleIndo-Pacific Humpback Dolphins: A Demographic Perspective of a Threatened Speciesen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailHuang, S: huangsl@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKarczmarski, L: leszek@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKarczmarski, L=rp00713en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-4-431-54523-1_13-
dc.identifier.hkuros231290en_US
dc.identifier.spage249en_US
dc.identifier.epage272en_US
dc.publisher.placeTokyo; New York-

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