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Conference Paper: Discovering the Learning and Teaching Approaches of Transferable Skills to Engage Students

TitleDiscovering the Learning and Teaching Approaches of Transferable Skills to Engage Students
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe Science Education Association of Thailand (SEAT).
Citation
The 2nd International Conference of Science Educators and Teachers (ISET 2014), Phuket, Thailand, 16-18 July 2014. In the Abstract Book of the ISET, 2014, p. 60-61, abstract no. C12 How to Cite?
AbstractGiven the growing attention among students, teachers and employers on the importance of transferable skills for both education and employment, there is a need to understand students’ perception of these skills before effective teaching approaches and assessment strategies can be developed to improve the teaching and learning of transferable skills. Studies on students’ perception of transferable skills have found that students’ perceived importance of and competency in transferable skills vary by skill. However, it is unclear to what extent these findings can be applied to the Hong Kong context as the majority of the studies were conducted in Western countries. In view of these issues, this paper presents a study conducted in Hong Kong on STEM students’ perception of transferable skills. A questionnaire was developed and administered to 1232 STEM students, who were required to self-assess their perceived importance level of and competency level in 38 transferable skills. They were also asked to indicate their attitude towards the teaching and learning approaches and assessment of transferable skills. It was found that students tended to give themselves a higher rating for their perceived level of importance of the transferable skills than their perceived competency level in those skills. It was also found that students generally believe that transferable skills are better developed through extra-curricular activities and majority of them disagreed that learning these skills is irrelevant. The findings will be discussed.
DescriptionParallel Session Oral 4-C
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199708

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuk, YYLen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CKYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T01:30:22Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-22T01:30:22Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2nd International Conference of Science Educators and Teachers (ISET 2014), Phuket, Thailand, 16-18 July 2014. In the Abstract Book of the ISET, 2014, p. 60-61, abstract no. C12en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199708-
dc.descriptionParallel Session Oral 4-C-
dc.description.abstractGiven the growing attention among students, teachers and employers on the importance of transferable skills for both education and employment, there is a need to understand students’ perception of these skills before effective teaching approaches and assessment strategies can be developed to improve the teaching and learning of transferable skills. Studies on students’ perception of transferable skills have found that students’ perceived importance of and competency in transferable skills vary by skill. However, it is unclear to what extent these findings can be applied to the Hong Kong context as the majority of the studies were conducted in Western countries. In view of these issues, this paper presents a study conducted in Hong Kong on STEM students’ perception of transferable skills. A questionnaire was developed and administered to 1232 STEM students, who were required to self-assess their perceived importance level of and competency level in 38 transferable skills. They were also asked to indicate their attitude towards the teaching and learning approaches and assessment of transferable skills. It was found that students tended to give themselves a higher rating for their perceived level of importance of the transferable skills than their perceived competency level in those skills. It was also found that students generally believe that transferable skills are better developed through extra-curricular activities and majority of them disagreed that learning these skills is irrelevant. The findings will be discussed.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Science Education Association of Thailand (SEAT).-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Conference of Science Educators and Teachersen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleDiscovering the Learning and Teaching Approaches of Transferable Skills to Engage Studentsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLuk, YYL: lillianluk@cetl.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailZhao, Y: myzhao@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, CKY: cecilia.chan@caut.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CKY=rp00892en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros231271en_US
dc.identifier.spage60, abstract no. C12-
dc.identifier.epage61, abstract no. C12-
dc.publisher.placeThailand-

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