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Article: Official Life: Homoerotic Self-Representation and Theater in Li Ciming’s Yuemantang Riji

TitleOfficial Life: Homoerotic Self-Representation and Theater in Li Ciming’s Yuemantang Riji
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherHigher Education Press and Brill Academic Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.brill.com/publications/journals/frontiers-history-china
Citation
Frontiers of History in China, 2014, v. 9 n. 2, p. 202-224 How to Cite?
AbstractHomoerotic play was central to the recreational culture of theatergoing from the mid-Qing to the beginning of the twentieth century, especially in Beijing. Theatergoing literati in particular played an important role in the production and reproduction of an elite, theater-based, homoerotic sub-culture, heavily investing themselves in the pursuit of social distinction. While it is important not to underestimate the importance of lower-status audiences in the popularisation of Peking opera, the literati doubtlessly considered themselves the aesthetic vanguard in terms of both the judgment of staged drama and the literary promotion of romances between themselves and the boy-actors offstage. Unlike “flower-guides” (Huapu) that circulated between friends, diaries from the period record private thoughts on the scene that would not, and could not, be expressed in public. Drawing on the diary of the influential late-Qing scholar-official Li Ciming (1830–94), I focus on the question of how an understanding of public participation entered Li’s diaries, as well as examining what his self-representations have to say about Qing literati ownership of homoerotic sensibilities and spaces, which is to say, how he saw himself as presenting to others and how that self-presentation is (re-)presented in his writing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199615

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T01:25:03Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-22T01:25:03Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers of History in China, 2014, v. 9 n. 2, p. 202-224en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199615-
dc.description.abstractHomoerotic play was central to the recreational culture of theatergoing from the mid-Qing to the beginning of the twentieth century, especially in Beijing. Theatergoing literati in particular played an important role in the production and reproduction of an elite, theater-based, homoerotic sub-culture, heavily investing themselves in the pursuit of social distinction. While it is important not to underestimate the importance of lower-status audiences in the popularisation of Peking opera, the literati doubtlessly considered themselves the aesthetic vanguard in terms of both the judgment of staged drama and the literary promotion of romances between themselves and the boy-actors offstage. Unlike “flower-guides” (Huapu) that circulated between friends, diaries from the period record private thoughts on the scene that would not, and could not, be expressed in public. Drawing on the diary of the influential late-Qing scholar-official Li Ciming (1830–94), I focus on the question of how an understanding of public participation entered Li’s diaries, as well as examining what his self-representations have to say about Qing literati ownership of homoerotic sensibilities and spaces, which is to say, how he saw himself as presenting to others and how that self-presentation is (re-)presented in his writing.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHigher Education Press and Brill Academic Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.brill.com/publications/journals/frontiers-history-chinaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers of History in Chinaen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleOfficial Life: Homoerotic Self-Representation and Theater in Li Ciming’s Yuemantang Rijien_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWu, C: wucuncun@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWu, C=rp01420en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.3868/s020-003-014-0014-7en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros231224en_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage202en_US
dc.identifier.epage224en_US
dc.publisher.placeBeijingen_US

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