File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL
Supplementary

Article: Astrology , Military, Agriculture: On "FengYu Fu” in Ancient China, Korea and Japan

TitleAstrology , Military, Agriculture: On "FengYu Fu” in Ancient China, Korea and Japan
術數、軍事、農業:論中韓日流傳的《風雨賦》
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherSouth Korea the Great East Asian Han Literary Society.
Citation
Great East Asian Han Literature, 2013, v. 39, p. 479-503 How to Cite?
大東漢文學, 2013, v. 39, p. 479-503 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Fengyu Fu is originally a book by Liu Qiming 劉敏明, a scholar of divination presumably lived between the Tang (618 ∼ 907) and the Song (960 ∼ 1279) Dynasties. It takes the fonn of 'rhymed-prose' ('LvFu'律願) which is commonly used during the Tang and Song period. In the Ming (1368 ∼ 1644) Dynasty, this book was added with detailed annotations by other scholars and was spread to the then Korea and Japan. It was highly valued both by the government and the common 야ople in the three countries. Being applicable to multiple fields, Fengyu Fu could serve as the basis for the court to monitor the sign of Heaven and promulgate decrees accordingly, as the guidance for the military to judge the situation and deploy forces, as the key for the farmers to forecast the weather and seek rich harvest, as well as the secret for the prophets to predict destiny and omens. All in all, it has exerted a significant influence in history. Therefore a thorough study of this book will not only help enhancing our understanding of the relationship between the folk religion and the literary mode, but also provide valuable insight to the research concerning traditional meteorology and cultural exchange among ancient China, Korea and Japan.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199612
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhan, HLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T01:25:03Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-22T01:25:03Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationGreat East Asian Han Literature, 2013, v. 39, p. 479-503en_US
dc.identifier.citation大東漢文學, 2013, v. 39, p. 479-503en_US
dc.identifier.issn1229-4411-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199612-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Fengyu Fu is originally a book by Liu Qiming 劉敏明, a scholar of divination presumably lived between the Tang (618 ∼ 907) and the Song (960 ∼ 1279) Dynasties. It takes the fonn of 'rhymed-prose' ('LvFu'律願) which is commonly used during the Tang and Song period. In the Ming (1368 ∼ 1644) Dynasty, this book was added with detailed annotations by other scholars and was spread to the then Korea and Japan. It was highly valued both by the government and the common 야ople in the three countries. Being applicable to multiple fields, Fengyu Fu could serve as the basis for the court to monitor the sign of Heaven and promulgate decrees accordingly, as the guidance for the military to judge the situation and deploy forces, as the key for the farmers to forecast the weather and seek rich harvest, as well as the secret for the prophets to predict destiny and omens. All in all, it has exerted a significant influence in history. Therefore a thorough study of this book will not only help enhancing our understanding of the relationship between the folk religion and the literary mode, but also provide valuable insight to the research concerning traditional meteorology and cultural exchange among ancient China, Korea and Japan.-
dc.languagechien_US
dc.publisherSouth Korea the Great East Asian Han Literary Society.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofGreat East Asian Han Literatureen_US
dc.relation.ispartof大東漢文學en_US
dc.titleAstrology , Military, Agriculture: On "FengYu Fu” in Ancient China, Korea and Japanen_US
dc.title術數、軍事、農業:論中韓日流傳的《風雨賦》en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhan, HL: hlzhan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhan, HL=rp01159en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros230308en_US
dc.identifier.volume39en_US
dc.identifier.spage479en_US
dc.identifier.epage503en_US
dc.publisher.placeSeoulen_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats