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Conference Paper: Homozygous Missense Mutation in ABR Causes Cerebellar Hypoplasia with Early Lethality - A New Condition Identified by Exome Sequencing?

TitleHomozygous Missense Mutation in ABR Causes Cerebellar Hypoplasia with Early Lethality - A New Condition Identified by Exome Sequencing?
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkjpaed.org/index.asp
Citation
The 2014 Joint Annual Scientific Meeting of the Hong Kong Paediatric Society and Hong Kong Paediatric Nurses Association, Hong Kong, China, 15 June 2014. In Hong Kong Journal of Paediatrics (New series), 2014, v. 19 n. 3, p. 206 How to Cite?
AbstractWe performed whole exome sequencing (WES) in a consanguineous Pakistani family with a recurrent pattern of cerebellar hyposplasia, intra-uterine growth restriction, and various CNS/non-CNS malformations, resulting in early lethality (1 perinatal death and 1 intrauterine death). Karyotype (in the first pregnancy) and oligonucleotide array (in the 2nd affected pregnancy) were normal. Parents declined post-mortem examination. By WES, a novel homozygous missense mutation was identified in the ABR gene (ABR: NM_021962.4:c.G2455T: p.A819S) in both affected pregnancies. Both parents were identified to be heterozygous of the same mutation while the healthy child did not carry any mutation. The mutation is located in a highly conserved region and is predicted to be highly damaging by all the commonly used in silico mutation prediction tools. The protein encoded by ABR gene contains a GTPase-activating protein domain, a domain found in members of the Rho family of GTP-binding proteins. Previous reports showed that OPHN1, mutations in which cause X-linked mental retardation with cerebellar hypoplasia (OMIM300486), also encodes for a regulator of GTPase-activating protein. Both OPHN1 and ABR are highly expressed in the human brain especially in the cerebellum, and both contain a GTPase-activating domain. Rho proteins are important mediators of intracellular signal transduction, which affects cell migration and cell morphogenesis. Other studies have demonstrated a regulatory role of Rho GTPase in differentiation of cerebellar neurons, and that ethanolassociated impairment of Rho GTPase might contribute to brain defects in fetal alcohol syndrome. Further functional studies, including zebrafish morpholino studies, are currently ongoing. WES can be helpful in individual families with undiagnosed lethal MCA syndromes to identify potentially responsible autosomal recessive mutations and may lead to a better understanding of the role of various developmental pathways in human embryogenesis.
DescriptionPoster Presentation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199442
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.194
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.123

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYing, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorShek, NWMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, WYen_US
dc.contributor.authorYeung, KSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KCen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, MHYen_US
dc.contributor.authorKan, SYAen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, YKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, BHY-
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T01:18:38Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-22T01:18:38Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2014 Joint Annual Scientific Meeting of the Hong Kong Paediatric Society and Hong Kong Paediatric Nurses Association, Hong Kong, China, 15 June 2014. In Hong Kong Journal of Paediatrics (New series), 2014, v. 19 n. 3, p. 206en_US
dc.identifier.issn1013-9923-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199442-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation-
dc.description.abstractWe performed whole exome sequencing (WES) in a consanguineous Pakistani family with a recurrent pattern of cerebellar hyposplasia, intra-uterine growth restriction, and various CNS/non-CNS malformations, resulting in early lethality (1 perinatal death and 1 intrauterine death). Karyotype (in the first pregnancy) and oligonucleotide array (in the 2nd affected pregnancy) were normal. Parents declined post-mortem examination. By WES, a novel homozygous missense mutation was identified in the ABR gene (ABR: NM_021962.4:c.G2455T: p.A819S) in both affected pregnancies. Both parents were identified to be heterozygous of the same mutation while the healthy child did not carry any mutation. The mutation is located in a highly conserved region and is predicted to be highly damaging by all the commonly used in silico mutation prediction tools. The protein encoded by ABR gene contains a GTPase-activating protein domain, a domain found in members of the Rho family of GTP-binding proteins. Previous reports showed that OPHN1, mutations in which cause X-linked mental retardation with cerebellar hypoplasia (OMIM300486), also encodes for a regulator of GTPase-activating protein. Both OPHN1 and ABR are highly expressed in the human brain especially in the cerebellum, and both contain a GTPase-activating domain. Rho proteins are important mediators of intracellular signal transduction, which affects cell migration and cell morphogenesis. Other studies have demonstrated a regulatory role of Rho GTPase in differentiation of cerebellar neurons, and that ethanolassociated impairment of Rho GTPase might contribute to brain defects in fetal alcohol syndrome. Further functional studies, including zebrafish morpholino studies, are currently ongoing. WES can be helpful in individual families with undiagnosed lethal MCA syndromes to identify potentially responsible autosomal recessive mutations and may lead to a better understanding of the role of various developmental pathways in human embryogenesis.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkjpaed.org/index.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Journal of Paediatrics (New series)en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleHomozygous Missense Mutation in ABR Causes Cerebellar Hypoplasia with Early Lethality - A New Condition Identified by Exome Sequencing?en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailYing, D: jonson@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailShek, NWM: sheknoel@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChu, WY: chuwyy@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTang, MHY: mhytang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKan, SYA: kansya@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, YK: ykchanc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChung, BHY: bhychung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTang, MHY=rp01701en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, YK=rp00453en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChung, BHY=rp00473en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros230883en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros232896-
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage206-
dc.identifier.epage206-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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