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Conference Paper: Erosive Tooth Wear and Beverage Consumption Among US Adults

TitleErosive Tooth Wear and Beverage Consumption Among US Adults
Authors
KeywordsErosion
Health services research and Wear
Issue Date2014
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925
Citation
The 92nd General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), Cape Town, South Africa, 25-28 June 2014. In Journal of Dental Research, 2014, v. 93 n. Special issue B: abstract no. 1388 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: We investigated the prevalence of erosive tooth wear (ETW), juice/drink consumption and associated factors in adults in the United States. Methods: We used the National Health and Nutrition Examinations Survey data for 2003-2004. ETW is defined as erosive tooth wear on at least one surface of at least one examined tooth. Drink/juice consumption collected via a Food Frequency Questionnaire was processed with DietCalc software to obtain average daily consumption frequency for all queried drinks and juice categories including milk. Survey-weighted descriptive and multivariable analyses with interaction terms were performed. Results: Our study sample consisted of 3773 adults (20 years and above) and 80% had evidence of erosive tooth wear. We found significant difference in the percent of ETW for age (lowest in 20-24 year old 63%), gender (lowest in female 76%) and race/ethnicity (lowest in African American 65%). Among those with and without ETW, consumption of soft drink was highest and that of tomato/vegetable juice was lowest. There was a significant difference in the consumption of fruit juice, milk and tomato/vegetable juices among those with and without ETW (p<0.005). After adjustment for demographic factors, drink/juice consumption was not predictive of ETW. Conclusion: We found substantial levels of erosive tooth wear in adults that is affected by demographic factors in a complex way. Drink/juice consumption in adults were not associated with ETW after adjusting for demographics.
DescriptionOral Presentation
Session 192: Keynote Address; Dental Erosion
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199338
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOkunseri, CEen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, MCMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYau, TWDen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, CPJen_US
dc.contributor.authorSzabo, Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T01:13:40Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-22T01:13:40Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 92nd General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), Cape Town, South Africa, 25-28 June 2014. In Journal of Dental Research, 2014, v. 93 n. Special issue B: abstract no. 1388en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199338-
dc.descriptionOral Presentation-
dc.descriptionSession 192: Keynote Address; Dental Erosion-
dc.description.abstractObjective: We investigated the prevalence of erosive tooth wear (ETW), juice/drink consumption and associated factors in adults in the United States. Methods: We used the National Health and Nutrition Examinations Survey data for 2003-2004. ETW is defined as erosive tooth wear on at least one surface of at least one examined tooth. Drink/juice consumption collected via a Food Frequency Questionnaire was processed with DietCalc software to obtain average daily consumption frequency for all queried drinks and juice categories including milk. Survey-weighted descriptive and multivariable analyses with interaction terms were performed. Results: Our study sample consisted of 3773 adults (20 years and above) and 80% had evidence of erosive tooth wear. We found significant difference in the percent of ETW for age (lowest in 20-24 year old 63%), gender (lowest in female 76%) and race/ethnicity (lowest in African American 65%). Among those with and without ETW, consumption of soft drink was highest and that of tomato/vegetable juice was lowest. There was a significant difference in the consumption of fruit juice, milk and tomato/vegetable juices among those with and without ETW (p<0.005). After adjustment for demographic factors, drink/juice consumption was not predictive of ETW. Conclusion: We found substantial levels of erosive tooth wear in adults that is affected by demographic factors in a complex way. Drink/juice consumption in adults were not associated with ETW after adjusting for demographics.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Researchen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectErosion-
dc.subjectHealth services research and Wear-
dc.titleErosive Tooth Wear and Beverage Consumption Among US Adultsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, MCM: mcmwong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMcGrath, CPJ: mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, MCM=rp00024en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcGrath, CPJ=rp00037en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros231079en_US
dc.identifier.volume93en_US
dc.identifier.issueSpecial issue B: abstract no. 1388en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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